What new bill means for Montana medical marijuana dispensaries

May 19th, 2019 by admin No comments »

BILLINGS – When Montana’s medical marijuana program first debuted in 2004 it unfortunately had some difficulties.

With the passing of Senate Bill 333 back in 2017 and the current passing of Bill 265, there have been a lot of revisions to the program that tackle different elements; the most notable change being the untethering of patients from only having one caregiver while placing a five ounce limit on the amount of marijuana patients can buy each month.

“It’s kind of just the wild west,” said Ryder Gerberding, owner of Medicine Creek Caregivers. “Everybody was advertising where they wanted to, doing whatever they wanted to, with absolutely no oversight.”

“The state will have a system set up of all the providers who are in their tracking system and you can choose whichever one you want to go to, so that will give patients the freedom if they’re traveling to go somewhere else,” said Jean Lucas, CFO of Montana Advanced Caregivers.

For patients now being allowed to shop at multiple dispensaries, what does that mean for competition in the industry?

It will allow providers to focus much more on their niche. For example, if a provider is excellent at making edibles, but their flowers don’t grow very well, this will allow them to focus their attention much more on perfecting just edibles.

In 2018 the total sales in the medical marijuana program reached $45 million dollars; with the tax being raised back to 4 percent to fund the program, where exactly is the excess revenue going?

“As the

Article source: https://kxlf.com/news/montana-news/2019/05/19/what-new-bill-means-for-montana-medical-marijuana-dispensaries/

New medical marijuana clinic opens in Baton Rouge

May 19th, 2019 by admin No comments »

BATON ROUGE, La. (WAFB) – Medical marijuana will soon be available to qualifying patients, despite recent roadblocks to access. Now, health care providers are expanding to provide for potential patients.

Article source: https://www.wafb.com/2019/05/19/new-medical-marijuana-clinic-opens-baton-rouge/

New medical marijuana clinic opens in Baton Rouge

May 19th, 2019 by admin No comments »

BATON ROUGE, La. (WAFB) – Medical marijuana will soon be available to qualifying patients, despite recent roadblocks to access. Now, health care providers are expanding to provide for potential patients.

Article source: https://www.wafb.com/2019/05/19/new-medical-marijuana-clinic-opens-baton-rouge/

Texas Senate Committee Approves House-Passed Medical Marijuana Expansion Bill

May 19th, 2019 by admin No comments »

Even as the Senate stonewalls a handful of bills aimed at lessening criminal penalties for possession of marijuana, an upper chamber committee on Friday advanced legislation that aims to vastly expand who has access to medical cannabis in the state.

As filed, state Rep. Stephanie Klick’s House Bill 3703 would add multiple sclerosis, epilepsy and spasticity to the list of debilitating medical conditions that qualify for cannabis oil. The progress on her bill comes four years after Klick authored legislation that narrowly opened up the state to the sale of the medicine.

The bill requires approval by the full Senate chamber before it can return to the Texas House, where lawmakers have already approved two bills to drastically expand the Compassionate Use Program, which currently only allows the sale of cannabis oil to people with intractable epilepsy who meet certain requirements. But according to the Senate sponsor of the bill, the legislation is likely to pass the upper chamber — despite leadership once expressing aversion to relaxing the existing state program.

Several who testified before the Senate committee pleaded with the panel to advance the bill, sharing personal stories of how using cannabis oil has helped them treat a bevy of medical ailments. Lawmakers from both parties were receptive to the emotional testimony and, after more than an hour of discussion, voted unanimously to send the legislation to the full Senate.

When laying out the bill in front of the Senate committee Friday, state Sen. Donna Campbell, R-New Braunfels, introduced

Article source: https://www.marijuanamoment.net/texas-senate-committee-approves-house-passed-medical-marijuana-expansion-bill/

Medical marijuana dispensary to open in Marietta soon

May 19th, 2019 by admin No comments »

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Photo by Janelle Patterson
Strawberry Fields, the medical marijuana dispensary at the corner of Greene Street and the Williamstown Bridge, is expected to open in early June.

MARIETTA — Access to medical marijuana in Southeast Ohio is near, following more than two years of legislation, rules and renovations.

Marietta City Law Director Paul Bertram confirmed Tuesday that the Marietta dispensary named Strawberry Fields, which has been under structural modification for the last year at the corner of Greene Street and the Williamstown Bridge ramp, has plans to open next month.

“They called and had indicated they would be opening in the first 10 days of June,” said Bertram. “They would still need final inspections and licensing through the state board of pharmacy, medical marijuana board and Department of Commerce.”

Ian James, head of corporate development for CannAscend, the operational partner with the dispensary, and Jimmy Gould, founder and CEO, did not return calls for comment Monday or Tuesday.

Medical Marijuana was legalized in 2016 after Ohio House Bill 523 passed. The first legal sales of the controlled substance did not occur until January this year, and that was the last time the issue again came before Marietta City Council’s Planning, Zoning, Annexation and Housing Committee.

Photo by Janelle Patterson
Strawberry Fields, the medical marijuana dispensary at the corner of Greene Street and the Williamstown Bridge, is expected to open in early

Article source: http://www.newsandsentinel.com/news/business/2019/05/medical-marijuana-dispensary-to-open-in-marietta-soon/

Colorado bill would allow doctors to recommend medical marijuana instead of prescription painkillers

May 18th, 2019 by admin No comments »

DENVER — Gov. Jared Polis (D-Colorado) is reviewing a Senate bill focused on fighting the opioid epidemic that would allow doctors to recommend medical marijuana in many of the same situations where they could prescribe opioids.

Sponsors of Senate Bill 19-013 said this option could help doctors avoid prescribing addictive painkillers for things like chronic pain, but members of the medical community are worried there’s not enough research about the effects of cannabis and that the bill’s language is too broad.

Rep. Edie Hooton (D-Boulder) is a sponsor of the bill, and said it is not a mandate, but rather an option for doctors to consider – especially when it comes to making recommendations for children.

“This is going to be a pretty big deal for acute pain for athletes,” Hooton said, “and also for kids who have surgeries.”

In order for children to currently be recommended medical marijuana, they need two physicians to sign off. Should SB 19-013 pass, it would also ask for a review of diagnosing records from the primary care physician. Hooten said this goes beyond what’s required in the constitution.

Kids would not be able to smoke marijuana, but could use a nasal spray or extract.

Jared Penman, who owns RiNo Supply Company – a medical marijuana dispensary – has been diagnosed with osteochondritis dissecans of the talus, tibia and fibula stage four. It’s a condition that causes extreme pain. 

“The inside of your bones basically fall out into your joints,” Penman said, “and the only thing doctors had to give me

Article source: https://www.9news.com/article/news/local/next/colorado-bill-would-allow-doctors-to-prescribe-medical-marijuana-instead-of-prescription-painkillers/73-ff744edb-b847-41b8-b9bb-f81c5db0b6aa

Mandatory testing of medical marijuana for toxins is needed

May 18th, 2019 by admin No comments »

opinion-WEB

Nearly 10 years after Arizona approved the use of medical marijuana, the medicine remains a controversial topic for many. In fact, universal agreement related to almost anything to do with marijuana would seem incredibly unlikely.

However, there is one area where nearly everyone agrees: Arizona should mandate testing of medical marijuana to ensure that patients are not inadvertently exposing themselves to toxic chemicals, E. Coli, Salmonella or mold. With 61 tons of the drug consumed last year, now is the time to be proactive to protect patients from unsafe contaminants.

While Arizona voters approved the use of medical marijuana in 2010, the state hasn’t instituted any required process to make sure that harmful herbicides, fungicides and residual solvents are not contained in this medicine. While many expected mandatory testing to be a part of the initial program, over the years Arizona has yet to require any testing of the drug.

That’s not for any lack of consensus. Health officials, patients and politicians on both sides of the aisle all agree. It’s mind-boggling to try to understand why it has taken this long to implement required testing of a medicine that 200,000 Arizonans take each year.

But this year may be different if we don’t run out of time.

Senate Bill 1494 requires independent third-parties to analyze the medicine for harmful toxins and molds. The bill unanimously passed the Senate in March and we’re hopeful this common-sense legislation is passed by the House before the end of session.

But with the possibility of

Article source: https://azcapitoltimes.com/news/2019/05/18/mandatory-testing-of-medical-marijuana-for-toxins-is-needed/

Lawmakers debate adding raw plant option to medical marijuana

May 18th, 2019 by admin No comments »

However, a new proposal aims to change that.

There’s currently a debate at the State Capitol on whether to allow the sale of raw plant, or flower, with medical cannabis prescriptions.

RELATED: Minnesota medical marijuana program nearly doubled in 2018

“We are one of the most restrictive in the country,” DFL Rep. Heather Edelson said. “Every other medical program in the United States allows plants to be sold.”

Edelson said doing so could cut prices for medical marijuana by about 50%.

“It would dramatically lower the cost,” she said.


The primary reason people qualify for medical marijuana in Minnesota is for intractable or incurable pain.  

Below are the four most-frequently certified qualifying medical conditions as of March 31 of this year.


Andover mother Katie Kennedy said she and her son both need medical cannabis for their various diagnoses. She said she pays $457 each month for her 13-year-old son Tyler’s prescriptions. Insurance doesn’t cover it, and she’s required to pay cash. 

“We are very much hoping that flower is passed and accepted into our program in Minnesota,” Kennedy said. 

Veterans are also asking for more options.

There was a demonstration on the Capitol steps Friday entitled “The Cold Hard Truth.” It featured a casket with a flag, filled with empty pill bottles, symbolizing the need for other medication options, like medical cannabis, at a much cheaper price. 

“In the state of Minnesota it’s very expensive,” said Jeremy Sankey with Minnesota Veterans for Cannabis. “The legislature has the ability to make changes to the program that could make it

Article source: https://kstp.com/medical/minnesota-lawmakers-raw-plant-flower-medical-marijuana/5357824/

Missouri Caught In ‘Goldilocks’ Situation As It Tries To Set Medical Marijuana Supply

May 18th, 2019 by admin No comments »

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services said it will distribute 338 licenses to grow and sell medical marijuana. The number is far less than the 510 hopefuls who have already paid application fees with hopes of receiving a license.

These licenses are for different aspects of the medical marijuana pipeline: 60 to cultivate marijuana, 192 to dispense and 86 to manufacture marijuana-infused products.

Even though the number of licenses to be issued is the minimum of what the law allows, a report from University of Missouri economists indicates that might be too much based on demand in other states with similar laws.

“My gut reaction tells me we probably don’t need 60 cultivating licenses to supply the market the first few years,” said Joe Haslag, who authored the report with two other economists.

Based on the sales from other states, the number would result in “a lot of product being left on the shelves for quite some time,” he said.

Haslag called the task of setting the marijuana supply a “Goldilocks situation.” If a state allows for too little marijuana, the prices will go up, and patients who need it won’t be able to afford it. But too much in the system could mean prices would fall so much that people might sell it illegally.

“What happens when a product can be used just as easily in a legal market and an illegal market? I mean, the plant doesn’t know how it’s being used,” Haslag said.

Some health advocates are concerned about the

Article source: https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/missouri-caught-goldilocks-situation-it-tries-set-medical-marijuana-supply

Texas medical marijuana expansion gains steam in Senate, even after previous stonewalling

May 17th, 2019 by admin No comments »

Even as the Senate stonewalls a handful of bills aimed at lessening criminal penalties for possession of marijuana, an upper chamber committee advanced legislation Friday that aims to vastly expand who has access to medical cannabis in the state.

As filed, state Rep. Stephanie Klick’s House Bill 3703 would add multiple sclerosis, epilepsy and spasticity to the list of debilitating medical conditions that qualify for cannabis oil. The progress on her bill comes four years after Klick authored legislation that narrowly opened up the state to the sale of the medicine.

The bill requires approval by the full Senate chamber before it can return to the Texas House, where lawmakers have already approved two bills to drastically expand the Compassionate Use Program, which currently only allows the sale of cannabis oil to people with intractable epilepsy who meet certain requirements. But according to the Senate sponsor of the bill, the legislation is likely to pass the upper chamber — despite leadership once expressing aversion to relaxing the state program.

Several who testified before the Senate committee pleaded with the panel to advance the bill, sharing personal stories of how using cannabis oil has helped them treat a bevy of medical ailments. Lawmakers from both parties were receptive to the emotional testimony and, after more than an hour of discussion, voted unanimously to send the legislation to the full Senate.

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When laying out the bill in front of the

Article source: https://www.texastribune.org/2019/05/17/texas-senate-medical-cannabis-expansion-bill/