Archive for April, 2019

NJ marijuana legalization: Medical marijuana could move on without recreational legal weed, expungement plan

April 30th, 2019

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Marijuana in various forms, including dried flower, edibles and concentrates, is displayed for sale at a black market pop-up event.Marijuana is sold in vacuum-sealed packages at a black market pop up event.Edible chocolate marijuana, designed to look like raw marijuana, is sold at a black market pop-up event.Marijuana in various forms, including dried flower, edibles and concentrates, is displayed for sale at a black market pop-up event.Jars of marijuana are displayed for sale at a black market pop-up event.Marijuana in various forms is displayed for sale at a black market weed pop-up event.Cannabis-infused brownies are sold at a black market pop-up event where marijuana was illegally sold.

  • Marijuana in various forms, including dried flower, edibles and concentrates, is displayed for sale at a black market pop-up event.1 of 7
  • Marijuana is sold in vacuum-sealed packages at a black market pop up event.2 of 7
  • Edible chocolate marijuana, designed to look like raw marijuana, is sold at a black market pop-up event.3 of 7
  • Marijuana in various forms, including dried flower, edibles<p>Article source: <a href=https://www.app.com/story/opinion/editorials/2019/04/30/nj-marijuana-legalization-weed-out-ignorance/3621090002/

Business Improving for Medical Marijuana Cultivator | News Local/State – WILL News

April 30th, 2019

The O’Hern family in west central Illinois has long been involved in traditional farming. They grow corn, soybeans, and wheat, plus they raise cattle. In the last few years they have added another crop to their repertoire: medical marijuana.

“Our head is above water, at least. We think things have gone pretty well,” said Tim O’Hern, chief operating officer for Nature’s Grace and Wellness, which is one of the state’s medical marijuana cultivation facilities.

“The Illinois Medical Cannabis Program started off pretty slowly in 2015 and ’16 and on into ’17. With some additional conditions that have been added by the legislature and the adoption of the Alternative to Opioids Act, we’re starting to see a market increase in patient adoption.”

O’Hern said one reason he got into the business was to create economic development in a rural community. The business employs around 35 full-time workers. He plans to expand over the next year and hopes to hire 40 to 50 more employees.

No signs are posted to mark this as Nature’s Grace and Wellness.

Nature’s Grace and Wellness is in Fulton County, not far from the small town of Vermont (population 645).  The steel building is red with white trim. It is surrounded by a chain link fence topped with three rows of barbed wire.

All the growing is done indoors. O’Hern does not know if the business will produce products for recreational marijuana (he prefers the phrase “adult use cannabis”) should the state legalize it.

“We can’t say

Article source: https://will.illinois.edu/news/story/business-improving-for-medical-marijuana-cultivator

NJ marijuana legalization: Medical marijuana could move on without recreational legal weed, expungement plan, but should it?

April 30th, 2019

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Marijuana in various forms, including dried flower, edibles and concentrates, is displayed for sale at a black market pop-up event.Marijuana is sold in vacuum-sealed packages at a black market pop up event.Edible chocolate marijuana, designed to look like raw marijuana, is sold at a black market pop-up event.Marijuana in various forms, including dried flower, edibles and concentrates, is displayed for sale at a black market pop-up event.Jars of marijuana are displayed for sale at a black market pop-up event.Marijuana in various forms is displayed for sale at a black market weed pop-up event.Cannabis-infused brownies are sold at a black market pop-up event where marijuana was illegally sold.

  • Marijuana in various forms, including dried flower, edibles and concentrates, is displayed for sale at a black market pop-up event.1 of 7
  • Marijuana is sold in vacuum-sealed packages at a black market pop up event.2 of 7
  • Edible chocolate marijuana, designed to look like raw marijuana, is sold at a black market pop-up event.3 of 7
  • Marijuana in various forms, including dried flower, edibles<p>Article source: <a href=https://www.app.com/story/opinion/editorials/2019/04/30/nj-marijuana-legalization-weed-out-ignorance/3621090002/

Fate of medical marijuana bill rests in Gov. Reynolds’ hands

April 30th, 2019

The 2019 legislative session adjourned Saturday, and one last-minute bill makes three substantial changes to Iowa’s medical marijuana law.

The bill, approved overwhelmingly by both Republicans and Democrats, expands the number of illnesses for which cannabidiol, or CBD, can be prescribed.

The list of conditions covered by the current law includes intractable pain, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, cancer, Crohn’s disease, HIV, terminal illness and Lou Gehrig’s disease, which is also called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS.

The Iowa Board of Medicine has now added severe autism and ulcerative colitis to the list.

The bill also expands the potency of the cannabis products, removing a 3% limit on THC. Dispensaries will be allowed to give out as much as grams of THC during a 90-day period.

West Des Moines Mayor Steve Gaer, a longtime advocate of medical marijuana, said CBD made a big difference in the life of his daughter, Margaret, who has epilepsy.

“As I understand it now, all 11 conditions, and probably 90% of the patients in Iowa, can now get the percentage of medication that they need to actually help them,” Gaer said.

Republican Sen. Brad Zaun said he believes CBD oil is an alternative to dangerous painkillers such as opioids.

“This is a big step, a very historical step, for a lot of people in the state of Iowa that are in pain,” Zaun said.

Gov. Kim Reynolds has 30 days to decide whether she will sign the bill into law.

AlertMe

Article source: https://www.kcci.com/article/bill-expanding-medical-marijuana-treatment-sent-to-kim-reynolds/27311795

If marijuana remains a Schedule I substance, we can never do the research everyone knows we need

April 29th, 2019

Cannabis has been known to humans for thousands of years, and there is nearly universal support for medical cannabis: Over 90 percent of Americans believe that cannabis should be legalized for medical use, according to a Quinnipiac Poll. Currently, 33 states and Washington, D.C., have legalized cannabis for medical purposes, and states such as Georgia have acted to expand medical cannabis laws.

In Georgia, for example, patients can register with the Georgia Department of Health and receive a card allowing them to possess cannabis for medical reasons. However, it is illegal for anyone to grow, buy or sell cannabis in the state, making it difficult for registered patients to actually acquire it. Just recently, though, the Georgia Legislature passed a bill to allow for the growing, manufacturing, testing and distribution of medical cannabis to those who have been approved by their physicians.

However, as the legal status of medical cannabis continues to evolve and its use increases — and after many years of human cultivation — we still don’t have a full understanding of the plant’s medicinal benefits.

Colombia’s medical marijuana industry: a way to end the stigma surrounding drugs?

April 29th, 2019

Colombia, a country that has suffered greatly under the stigma of the illegal drug trade, has an opportunity to reinvent itself with the cultivation of a plant that for decades has been controlled by illegal groups: marijuana.

A 2016 law regulating the use of cannabis for scientific and medicinal purposes has been decisive in this regard. The law, which came into effect last year, allows for the legal cultivation of up to 40.5 tonnes, 44 per cent of the limit allowed by the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB).

There are already around 70 companies in the country with licenses issued by the Colombian Ministry of Health and Justice to legally cultivate marijuana for medicinal purposes. However, the authorities acknowledged in 2018 that there were still 234 hectares of illicit marijuana crops in the country, which generate more than 900 tons of illegal cannabis with more than four harvests every year.

Cannabis as a symbol of peace

After abandoning her small business in Colombia’s Caribbean region when she received threats of extortion from organised crime syndicates, 34-year-old Neira Patricia Santiago Medina, Pati to her friends, never imagined that marijuana could provide her with dignified work and a future for her family. “I always associated it with the boys who smoke it to get high. How could I have known that it could be good for my health?” she says.

In late 2018, Pati began working at Clever Leaves, a medical marijuana company founded in Bogotá two years earlier by two entrepreneurs and

Article source: https://www.equaltimes.org/colombia-s-medical-marijuana

Medical marijuana dispensary opens in Meriden – Meriden Record

April 29th, 2019

MERIDEN — Willow Brook Wellness, the city’s first licensed medical marijuana dispensary, has opened on East Main Street.

The dispensary, in a plaza at 1371 E. Main St., is expected to begin sales Monday, according to a newsletter sent out by Willow Brook Wellness last week.

A Willow Brook representative couldn’t be reached for comment, but state Department of Consumer Protection Spokeswoman Lora Rae Anderson said last week the dispensary was accepting registrations and expected to begin sales Monday. The Department of Consumer Protection oversees the licensing and operation of medical marijuana businesses

The dispensary is one of 18 around the state. In December, DCP awarded licenses to nine new dispensaries, including the one in Meriden, to accommodate a growing demand.

Only patients registered for the state medical marijuana program can receive marijuana from the dispensary. To qualify, patients must be receiving treatment for one of over 30 pre-approved “debilitating medical conditions.”

The company chose to open at the Meriden location because “of its convenient location to serve the patients of Central Connecticut and the surrounding towns and cities,” as well as its easy access to several major highways, the company wrote in its application.

Prior to getting state approval, the dispensary obtained local approvals from the city.

The dispensary is open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. It is closed Sunday.

The DCP also licenses four medical marijuana producers in the state that supply dispensaries.

One of the producers, Connecticut Pharmaceutical Solutions,

Article source: http://www.myrecordjournal.com/News/Meriden/Meriden-News/Medical-marijuana-dispensary-opens-on-East-Main-Street-in-Meriden.html

Utah’s medical marijuana program limits growing to 10 farms

April 29th, 2019


News

Utah’s medical marijuana program limits growing to 10 farms

Utah will allow 10 growers to produce the state’s medical marijuana — a limit that state officials say will prevent overproduction but a cannabis business consultant says could cause shortages.

The state medical cannabis law enacted last year limits each grower to cultivating no more than 4 acres (1.6 hectares) outdoors or 100,000 square feet (9,300 square meters) indoors, the Salt Lake Tribune reported last week.

The state expects that growers under the cap will be able to produce enough to supply 100,000 patients for a year. The state aimed to balance the restrictions to prevent excess marijuana from ending up in the illegal drug trade while still producing enough for patients.

Marijuana pharmacies are set to open in the state next year. Some might have bare shelves in the early days, but it won’t be because of

Article source: https://www.newsobserver.com/news/article229782629.html

Utah’s medical marijuana program limits growing to 10 farms

April 28th, 2019


News

Utah’s medical marijuana program limits growing to 10 farms

Utah will allow 10 growers to produce the state’s medical marijuana — a limit that state officials say will prevent overproduction but a cannabis business consultant says could cause shortages.

The state medical cannabis law enacted last year limits each grower to cultivating no more than 4 acres (1.6 hectares) outdoors or 100,000 square feet (9,300 square meters) indoors, the Salt Lake Tribune reported last week.

The state expects that growers under the cap will be able to produce enough to supply 100,000 patients for a year. The state aimed to balance the restrictions to prevent excess marijuana from ending up in the illegal drug trade while still producing enough for patients.

Marijuana pharmacies are set to open in the state next year. Some might have bare shelves in the early days, but it won’t be because of

Article source: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/article229782629.html

Could recreational marijuana impact the medical marijuana industry? – Observer

April 28th, 2019

Editor’s note: This is the last of a three-part series.

If a proposal by two Pennsylvania senators to legalize marijuana for recreational purposes is approved, there may soon be two markets for cannabis in Pennsylvania: medical and recreational.

What impact would the introduction of adult marijuana use have on the medical cannabis industry?

It’s difficult to speculate, but some local medical marijuana dispensers believe legalization provides an opportunity to enter a new market, while others are concerned about how recreational marijuana would be rolled out.

“I think it’s important to recognize the robustness of the medical program. With our 21 qualifying conditions and the set-up the state has put forward with the launch of this program, we’re fully confident that the medical marijuana industry will remain robust,” said Corinne Ogrodnik, co-founder of Maitri Medicinals, a medical cannabis dispensary in Uniontown. “We think it will remain very strong, with adult use as well.”

The Pennsylvania medical marijuana program marked its first anniversary in February. In that time, more than 116,000 Pennsylvanians have registered as patients (and 83,000 have been issued their identification cards, which allows them to buy cannabis products from dispensaries); dispensaries have taken in $132 million in sales, and the state has collected more than $2 million in tax revenue from growers and processors.

Recreational and medical markets are completely separate, emphasized Chris Kohan, CEO and co-founder of The Healing Center, a medical marijuana dispensary in Washington.

“I think there’s a clear distinction. People coming in for medical reasons are not looking to get a buzz;

Article source: https://observer-reporter.com/series/budding_dilemma/could-recreational-marijuana-impact-the-medical-marijuana-industry/article_d9bd5266-56fa-11e9-afa1-43b2065a8f08.html