Archive for January, 2019

Why are Ohio’s medical marijuana prices so high?

January 21st, 2019

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Ohio’s seed to sale process for producing medical marijuana.
Michael Nyerges, Cincinnati Enquirer

Moments after CY+ Dispensary sold some of the first legal medical marijuana in Ohio, the crowd of patients waiting outside for their turn to make state history wanted to know one thing: How much?

They weren’t happy with the answer: $50 cash for a small plastic container holding 2.83 grams of dried marijuana bud, or just under $500 an ounce.

“I’ll buy one today to say I did it, but I can get it a lot cheaper than that elsewhere,” said one man who declined to be named.

How cheap? Michigan dispensaries charge between $150 and $300 an ounce, depending on the variety, or strain. Patients say that’s similar to prices for illicit marijuana in Ohio. 

Dispensaries sold 8.7 pounds of marijuana on Ohio’s first day at an average price of$538 per ounce, according to sales figures released Thursday.

Why so much? There are a few reasons.

Regulated and tested

Marijuana sold in legal markets have a hard time competing with product sold on the black market for several reasons.

Legal marijuana businesses have to comply with regulations for pesticides, tracking every plant with sophisticated software, security and more. They also pay taxes, and because marijuana remains an illegal substance on the federal level, they can’t deduct expenses the way other businesses can.

Ohio law requires every medical marijuana product to be tested by an independent state-licensed lab. There

Article source: https://www.cincinnati.com/story/money/2019/01/20/why-ohios-medical-marijuana-prices-high/2602221002/

Illinois Dispensaries Prepare for Medical Marijuana Program

January 21st, 2019

Illinois is about to roll out a pilot program that will offer patients access to medical marijuana as an alternative to opioids, and medical cannabis dispensaries across the state are getting ready.

Dispensaries are extending hours and hiring additional workers for the expected increased demand in medical marijuana once the Opioid Alternative Pilot Program launches at the end of January, The Chicago Tribune reported. The Illinois Department of Public Health’s program will allow medical marijuana to be used in place of prescription painkillers.

Mission South Shore medical marijuana dispensary has increased parking space and its workforce over the past six months in preparation for the program, said Rick Armstrong, the dispensary’s general manager.

“We want to be prepared if one patient comes in the door or 100 patients,” he said. “We want to be there, ready to go.”

Then-Gov. Bruce Rauner signed the pilot program into law in August. Patients previously had to have one of about 40 conditions, such as cancer or AIDS, to qualify for medical cannabis.

To qualify for the pilot program, patients must be certified by a doctor. Patients can then register for the program at a dispensary or the local health department for a $10 fee. People who qualify for the program must visit a doctor every 90 days in order to renew the certification.

Staff at Green Thumb Industries, a Chicago-based medical marijuana provider, are training to learn how to patients safely transition from opioids to medical cannabis, said Jennifer Dooley, the company’s

Article source: https://www.nbcchicago.com/news/local/illinois-dispensaries-prepare-for-medical-marijuana-program-504629161.html

Second medical marijuana clinic opens in North Port – Sarasota Herald

January 20th, 2019

The man who helped start south Sarasota County’s first medical marijuana clinic opened a new clinic

NORTH PORT — The man who helped start south Sarasota County’s first medical marijuana clinic with an aggressive social media campaign that lined up more than 450 potential patients before Amendment 2 took effect has opened a new clinic in North Port.

Patrick DeLuca, 36, president of Medicann Clinic, 3151 Bobcat Village Center Road, said the business model for the the clinic — which opened Jan. 14 — is designed to provide patients more time with Dr. Heidi Kunstman.

Kunstman will only see 14 patients in a seven-hour day, meaning she can spend as much as 30 minutes a session per patient.

“Our mission is to do this the right way, a responsible practice of medicine that puts the patient first,” DeLuca said.

Patient visits to medical marijuana clinics are not covered by insurance and doctors do not prescribe medical marijuana. Rather they examine patients, evaluate their health history and determine whether medical marijuana is an option.

Patients then must apply to the state for a medical marijuana card. The process includes an initial registration fee of $75, and an annual renewal fee of $75.

Until last July, DeLuca worked with Dr. Barry M. Gordon, and helped launch the Compassionate Cannabis Care Clinic of Venice in January 2017. Amendment 2 took effect on Jan. 2, 2017

DeLuca, who lives in North Port, wanted to try a different business model there — lower volume, with more time for interaction between doctor

Article source: https://www.heraldtribune.com/news/20190120/second-medical-marijuana-clinic-opens-in-north-port

Illinois dispensaries prepare for medical marijuana program

January 20th, 2019

Illinois is about to roll out a pilot program that will offer patients access to medical marijuana as an alternative to opioids, and medical cannabis dispensaries across the state are getting ready.

Dispensaries are extending hours and hiring additional workers for the expected increased demand in medical marijuana once the Opioid Alternative Pilot Program launches at the end of January, The Chicago Tribune reported. The Illinois Department of Public Health’s program will allow medical marijuana to be used in place of prescription painkillers.

Mission South Shore medical marijuana dispensary has increased parking space and its workforce over the past six months in preparation for the program, said Rick Armstrong, the dispensary’s general manager.

“We want to be prepared if one patient comes in the door or 100 patients,” he said. “We want to be there, ready to go.”

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Then-Gov. Bruce Rauner signed the pilot program into law in August. Patients previously had to have one of about 40 conditions, such as cancer or AIDS, to qualify for medical cannabis.

To qualify for the pilot program, patients must be certified by a doctor. Patients can then register for the program at a dispensary or the local health department for a $10 fee. People who qualify for the program must visit a doctor every 90 days in order to renew the certification.

Staff at Green Thumb Industries, a Chicago-based medical marijuana provider, are training to learn how to patients safely transition from opioids to medical cannabis, said Jennifer Dooley, the company’s

Article source: https://www.thenewstribune.com/news/business/article224833455.html

Medical marijuana cultivation site proposed for Sarcoxie

January 20th, 2019

It was neither rhyme nor reason that prompted Paul Callicoat to choose a 70-acre property in Sarcoxie for his new business venture.

Callicoat, a retired Joplin cardiologist Joplin, was on a Sunday drive with his wife when they stumbled upon the former Sarcoxie Nursery, vacant for the better part of four years. He said it was the perfect location.

“We drive onto the property, we look at the water tower, we look at the magnificent ornamental trees, and 20 minutes later, I had the real estate agent there,” said Callicoat. “We decided right away that’s where we wanted to do it.”

The property — half in Sarcoxie and half in Jasper County — could soon become home to one of the first medical marijuana cultivation operations in Southwest Missouri. Callicoat is one of the first people in the state to go public with plans to enter the new industry that should be fully operational by this time next year.

The door was opened when voters approved Amendment 2 by a 2-to-1 margin in November, making Missouri the 31st state to legalize medical marijuana. The new law allows doctors and patients to consider marijuana as a treatment option for

Article source: https://www.joplinglobe.com/news/local_news/medical-marijuana-cultivation-site-proposed-for-sarcoxie/article_57638c46-316c-59b4-aa24-7e7a513ad7ee.html

Medical marijuana firm plans to add dispensaries in Miami-Dade County

January 20th, 2019


NORTH MIAMI BEACH, Fla. – A Wynwood-based medical marijuana company opened a new dispensary in North Miami Beach this week, the first in a five-store expansion in Miami-Dade County.

Knox Medical, which operates seven other dispensaries in Florida, gave the public a tour of its newest shop Saturday in the 100 block of Northwest 167th Street. Stores in Kendall, Cutler Bay and South Beach are expected to open this year. A Coral Gables location is planned for 2020.

Florida voters approved medical marijuana in 2016 voter referendum, but its implementation has been hamstrung by opposition from state lawmakers and lawsuits. 

Newly elected Gov. Ron DeSantis has pledged to revisit the state’s approach to medical marijuana. This week, DeSantis said he wants the Legislature to overturn its ban on smokable forms of medical marijuana. The previous administration of Gov. Rick Scott had been involved in protracted legal battle to defend the ban.

Article source: https://www.local10.com/news/florida/north-miami-beach/medical-marijuana-firm-plans-to-add-dispensaries-in-miami-dade-county

Missouri lawmakers propose affirmative action for medical marijuana licensing

January 19th, 2019

Courtesy of 123rf.com

Article source: https://www.stltoday.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/missouri-lawmakers-propose-affirmative-action-for-medical-marijuana-licensing/article_bec7eebe-931e-58b5-839d-d34f2bb232aa.html

Aiken lawmaker backs fresh push for medical marijuana in S.C.

January 19th, 2019

There’s a renewed effort to legalize medical marijuana in South Carolina, and at least one local lawmaker is supporting the effort.

Nearly identical medical marijuana bills have been filed – both this week – in the S.C. House and Senate, and state Rep. Bill Taylor, R-Aiken, stands behind them.

“I have been a supporter of the Compassionate Care Act since it was first brought into legislation four years ago, and I continue to be an advocate,” Taylor said Friday, adding: “It’s personal with me, very personal.”

State Rep. Peter McCoy, R-Charleston, led the House version; state Sen. Tom Davis, R-Beaufort, led the Senate version. Together, they’re companion bills.


+1 

State Rep. Bill Taylor, R-Aiken.

Article source: https://www.aikenstandard.com/news/aiken-lawmaker-backs-fresh-push-for-medical-marijuana-in-s/article_daf29a1c-1b2a-11e9-ae0c-637a322b8739.html

Raimondo’s medical marijuana plan would add dispensaries, restrict home-growing

January 19th, 2019


Article source: https://www.wpri.com/politics/raimondo-s-medical-marijuana-plan-would-add-dispensaries-restrict-home-growing/1710839747

Why the Cleveland Clinic Will Not Recommend Medical Marijuana

January 19th, 2019

January 18, 2019

As medical marijuana dispensaries began ringing up sales for the first time in Ohio on January 16, the Cleveland Clinic — one of the largest hospitals in the country — issued an official statement rejecting cannabis use for patients.

“As a group of more than 3,500 doctors at the Cleveland Clinic, we decided that we are not going to recommend medical marijuana, and it is not part of our policy,” says Paul Terpeluk, DO, the medical director of the Cleveland Clinic’s employee health services. “There are no rigorous studies that we are aware of showing that medical marijuana is safe. For a patient, safety should be the first concern, and that’s why we’re raising a red flag.”

In a statement published on the hospital’s website, Dr. Terpeluk explained that cannabis is not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which has a rigorous process for determining the safety and efficacy of medications. Medications green-lighted by the FDA go through extensive trials to establish accurate dosing and to identify side effects.

On the other hand, the Cleveland Clinic does prescribe FDA-approved medications that are based on specific marijuana compounds called cannabinoids. One such drug, Marinol, contains a cannabinoid called dronabinol. Dronabinol is a man-made form of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. Cancer and AIDs patients may take Marinol to stimulate appetite, reduce nausea, and relieve neuropathic pain.

In June 2018, the FDA for the first time authorized the use of a drug containing a purified extract from

Article source: https://www.everydayhealth.com/marijuana/why-cleveland-clinic-will-not-recommend-medical-marijuana/