Archive for October, 2018

Cumberland County corrections officer arrested on drug-dealing charge

October 30th, 2018

A corrections officer at the Cumberland County Jail has been arrested and charged with dealing cocaine.

Davis Glazener, 22, of South Portland, was arraigned at the Cumberland County courthouse in Portland Wednesday afternoon on the felony charge and did not enter a plea during the hearing.

David Glazener

While Glazener was in court, Sheriff Kevin Joyce talked with the media at his office about the arrest.

Glazener has been a corrections officer for two years, Joyce said. There is no preliminary indication that the alleged drug trafficking is connected to his work at the jail, according to the sheriff.

“It appears he was living two lives,” Joyce said.

The Cumberland County Sheriff’s Office, the South Portland Police Department and the Maine Drug Enforcement Agency learned about the allegations Tuesday, according to an affidavit filed in the case.

An unnamed source told law enforcement agents that Glazener sells narcotics, and they had seen him with different types of drugs, including cocaine, large amounts of marijuana and molly, also known as MDMA or ecstacy. Glazener had also showed the source a cell phone app used for money transfers, saying, “the money is just rolling in.” He had also allegedly shown the source photos of drugs in a safe in “amounts only seen in movies,” the affidavit said.

At the request of a state DEA agent, the source texted Glazener, asking to buy “snow,” a street name for cocaine. They arranged for the source to pick up cocaine from Glazener’s mailbox and deliver a $220 payment later

Article source: https://www.pressherald.com/2018/10/24/corrections-officer-arrested-for-drug-dealing-in-cumberland-county/

Golden keeps up swift fundraising pace in Maine’s 2nd District

October 30th, 2018
Robert F. Bukaty | AP

Good morning from Augusta. Assistant House Majority Leader Jared Golden has fundraising momentum in his race with U.S. Rep. Bruce Poliquin of Maine’s 2nd District, whom he outraised by more than seven times over the first 17 days of October.

The toss-up race is the hottest one in Maine in 2018, seeing one of the highest shares of TV advertising of all U.S. House of Representatives races in the nation as Democrats prioritize knocking off Poliquin and seizing the chamber majority from Republicans.

Modeling from FiveThirtyEight shows a race that could be tilting toward the Democrat. President Donald Trump weighed in on Thursday by tweet-endorsing Poliquin — a notable step, since Poliquin never publicly endorsed Trump ahead of their 2016 victories in the 2nd District.

Poliquin has been outspent by his opponent before but not by this much. Golden is harnessing lots of Democratic fundraising momentum in his

Article source: https://bangordailynews.com/2018/10/26/politics/daily-brief/golden-keeps-up-swift-fundraising-pace-in-maines-2nd-district/

Questions lead to delay in Maine’s cannabis consulting contract

October 29th, 2018

Maine is delaying the opening of its marijuana consulting proposals until Nov. 8, giving applicants an extra week to respond to new information from the state.

Would-be consultants hit the state with almost two dozen questions about its consulting solicitation, ranging from technical queries about things as minor as how to number the pages of an application and whether the consultant would be working with nongovernmental groups to develop Maine’s cannabis regulations, to more complex questions about how the state would handle potential conflicts of interest.

The state publishes interested parties’ questions, as well as its answers, in advance of the opening so applicants can incorporate them into their submissions.

The QA revealed that Jacques Santucci, the husband of Wellness Connection of Maine CEO Patricia Rosi, may seek the consulting job. He wanted to know if his connection to the head of the company that operates four of Maine’s eight licensed medical marijuana dispensaries would disqualify him. The state did not respond directly, but said it would address potential conflicts during the evaluation process.

“We are not sure yet if we want to apply,” Santucci told the Press Herald. “We are getting more business in Maine and in New England, in general.”

Santucci is the head of several consulting firms, including Nucleus-One, a marijuana-focused consulting company. He also runs a marijuana-focused software firm.

The QA revealed several consultant applicants – not necessarily Santucci – may bid on the state’s seed-to-sale tracking system. One who is in the running to be a project manager for a seed-to-sale

Article source: https://www.pressherald.com/2018/10/29/questions-lead-to-delay-in-cannabis-consulting-contract/

Open Rockland city council seat draws three candidates

October 29th, 2018
Stephen Betts | BDN

With an incumbent not seeking re-election to the Rockland City Council this November, three candidates are vying for a single seat.

Dale Hayward, 72, Brandy Perkins, 38, and Benjamin Dorr, 34, are hoping to be the newest voice on the five-member council. Councilor Adam Ackor, who was elected in 2016, is not seeking re-election.

This race is a political first for Perkins and Dorr, who have not previously run for public office. Hayward ran for Rockland City Council in 2009 and 2012, though he did not win these races.

All three have strong ties to Rockland or Greater Knox County. Hayward, who is retired, has lived in the city for 38 years. He has previously worked as a state auditor, owned an office supply store and drove tour buses across the United States. Hayward said these experiences would be a benefit if he were elected.

Hayward said he is running because he doesn’t “like the way things are going”

Article source: https://bangordailynews.com/2018/10/29/politics/open-rockland-city-council-seat-draws-three-candidates/

York County state Senate candidate brings history of controversy

October 28th, 2018

SACO — The early morning customers at the Golden Rooster Restaurant eyed the candidate warily.

Stavros Mendros approached each table with an easy charm, a stack of campaign fliers in his hand. The customers were polite but focused on eating their breakfast.

At the counter, the group of mostly older men were more interested in talking about the Red Sox playoff game. When Mendros came over and offered them fliers, no one reached a hand out to take one.

Mendros is not that well known, either by face or by name, in the northern York County district where he’s running for state Senate.

Given his history in Maine politics, though, that might work to his advantage.

The Republican who until recently lived nearly all his life in Lewiston has a lengthy history, first as an elected official and then as a petition signature gatherer. In nearly all of his endeavors, controversy has followed.

On paper, Mendros has just two official violations: by the Maine Ethics Commission in the late 1990s for filing a late campaign spending report when he was running for a legislative seat, and a misdemeanor conviction in 2007 for failing to properly administer an oath to several petition gatherers who worked for him.

But he’s been involved in numerous other questionable campaigns and often has been scrutinized for his signature-gathering practices. Two years ago, he was hired by controversial casino developers Shawn and Lisa Scott. This year, he collected signatures for Republican U.S. Senate candidate Max Linn, many of which were later

Article source: https://www.pressherald.com/2018/10/28/york-county-state-senate-candidate-brings-history-of-controversy/

Here’s where the Maine House of Representatives candidates stand on key issues

October 27th, 2018
Robert F. Bukaty | AP

Ahead of the Nov. 6 election, the Bangor Daily News put the same eight questions to every candidate on the ballot in each of the 151 Maine House of Representatives districts, getting their stances on the economy, health care, infrastructure and other issues.

[Where the Maine Senate candidates stand on the economy, health care and more]

Click on your House district number below to jump to the responses from your local candidates, which are being published unedited. Don’t know what your district number is? Search for the name of your town; we’ve included maps for each district to clarify towns that are divided into multiple districts.

District 1: Kittery | District 2: Eliot, Kittery, South Berwick | District 3: York | District 4: Ogunquit, Sanford, Wells, York | District 5: Berwick, North Berwick | District 6: North Berwick, South Berwick | District 7: Wells | District 8: Kennebunk |

Article source: https://bangordailynews.com/2018/10/25/politics/heres-where-the-maine-house-of-representatives-candidates-stand-on-key-issues/

Front-runners in governor’s race outline differences on drug crisis

October 27th, 2018

AUGUSTA — The four candidates running to be Maine’s next governor squared off in a debate for the second time this week, maintaining the civil tone that has characterized the contest even as they outlined their differences on key issues at the University of Maine at Augusta on Thursday night.

Just 12 days before Election Day, Democrat Janet Mills and Republican Shawn Moody, the front-runners, differed on how they would address the drug crisis, abortion and health care. The two independents in the race, state Treasurer Terry Hayes and Alan Caron, a Freeport businessman and consultant, mostly sided with Mills, including agreeing that health care was a human right.

When asked what she would do as governor to help Mainers suffering from substance use disorders, and not just opioid addiction, Mills, Maine’s attorney general, pointed to her effort to provide the overdose antidote naloxone, known by its trade name Narcan, to 85 different police departments.

She said 552 lives had been saved with those doses of Narcan and that just this week a 26-year-old woman who is four months pregnant was saved. Mills said her plan to help tackle the crisis is extensive but it would include a “hub and spoke” treatment system as well as increased efforts at prevention and education, as well as law enforcement.

Moody said he would focus on resourcing “law enforcement” adequately to go after drug-trafficking gangs, but also that he supported “sober houses” and “peer-to-peer” counseling programs.

“No one can help somebody to a pathway to

Article source: https://www.pressherald.com/2018/10/25/front-runners-in-governors-race-outline-differences-on-drug-crisis/

Getting your marijuana card different in New Hampshire, Maine

October 26th, 2018

If you suffer from chronic pain, nausea and loss of appetite, post-traumatic stress disorder, multiple sclerosis or a host of other conditions, you may be able to get prescription for medical marijuana that could help.

While it has still not been legalized by the federal government, 30 states, including all the ones in New England, have passed laws legalizing cannabis for medical purposes.

New Hampshire passed a law decriminalized possession of small amounts of the drug in 2017, and this year, Maine legalized its use outright, though some regulation issues are still to be worked out. Both states have enacted separate medical marijuana legislation.

That said, the process for people seeking to get a prescription varies. Simply put, Maine has made it easy for patients to get medical marijuana; New Hampshire has made it hard.

Pain-care specialist Kelly DeFeo is happy to see states pass such legislation. It means she has another tool in her kit to help people deal with chronic pain — and particularly an alternative to opioids, which though effective in treating pain have a number of side effects and carry greater dangers of addiction.

As a long-term pain specialist in New Hampshire, DeFeo says she has been at ground zero of a disaster as the opioid crisis developed in the state.

“And you know what was hard, was when before the law was implemented or even passed, we had Maine patients that had access to legal medical marijuana for chronic pain. and my New Hampshire patients didn’t, and you could see the

Article source: https://www.conwaydailysun.com/community/health/getting-your-marijuana-card-different-in-new-hampshire-maine/article_079d2b10-d79f-11e8-b0c6-7f361752a050.html

Maine State Police Troop F Report, Oct. 8-14, 2018

October 26th, 2018

Editor’s Note: An arrest or summons does not constitute a finding of guilt. An individual charged with a crime is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty at criminal proceedings.

HOULTON, Maine — The Maine State Police Troop F barracks in Houlton responded to 110 calls for service during the period of Oct. 8-14, including the following.

Tuesday, Oct. 9

Smyrna: Trooper Duff was conducting traffic enforcement along US Highway 2, Smyrna. During the stop, Tr. Duff noticed a package in the man’s pocket that he suspected was illegal drugs. Upon further investigation, it was determined the man was in possession of a useable amount of heroin. The man is currently on probation from New Hampshire and is being supervised in Maine. The probation officer was contacted but said he was not going to violate the man’s probation. Tr. Duff arrested the man for possession of heroin and transported him to the Aroostook County Jail in Houlton.

Wednesday, Oct. 10

Orient: Cpl. Quint and Tr. Duff responded to a serious injury crash in Orient. A woman was at the intersection of the Deering Lake Road and US Highway 1 intending to turn left. A loaded log truck was driving north on US Highway 1. The woman pulled out in front of the trailer truck, causing the truck to crash into the front of her car. Her vehicle was heavily damaged and the Jaws of Life were used to extract her from the vehicle. She was transported to Houlton Regional Hospital for serious but

Article source: https://fiddleheadfocus.com/2018/10/26/news/police_fire/maine-state-police-troop-f-report-oct-8-14-2018/

Front-runners in governor’s race outline differences on drug crisis

October 26th, 2018

AUGUSTA — The four candidates running to be Maine’s next governor squared off in a debate for the second time this week, maintaining the civil tone that has characterized the contest even as they outlined their differences on key issues at the University of Maine at Augusta on Thursday night.

Just 12 days before Election Day, Democrat Janet Mills and Republican Shawn Moody, the front-runners, differed on how they would address the drug crisis, abortion and health care. The two independents in the race, state Treasurer Terry Hayes and Alan Caron, a Freeport businessman and consultant, mostly sided with Mills, including agreeing that health care was a human right.

When asked what she would do as governor to help Mainers suffering from substance use disorders, and not just opioid addiction, Mills, Maine’s attorney general, pointed to her effort to provide the overdose antidote naloxone, known by its trade name Narcan, to 85 different police departments.

She said 552 lives had been saved with those doses of Narcan and that just this week a 26-year-old woman who is four months pregnant was saved. Mills said her plan to help tackle the crisis is extensive but it would include a “hub and spoke” treatment system as well as increased efforts at prevention and education, as well as law enforcement.

Moody said he would focus on resourcing “law enforcement” adequately to go after drug-trafficking gangs, but also that he supported “sober houses” and “peer-to-peer” counseling programs.

“No one can help somebody to a pathway to

Article source: https://www.centralmaine.com/2018/10/25/front-runners-in-governors-race-outline-differences-on-drug-crisis/