Archive for the ‘news’ category

Wiscasset voters reject school energy project, town planner’s budget …

June 26th, 2017

The Wiscasset School Department’s proposed $1.75 million energy conservation performance contract, the town planner’s budget and two social service requests were voted down at Wiscasset’s annual town meeting by referendum Tuesday, June 13.

All other warrant articles were approved, including an article introduced by citizen’s petition asking if voters reject changes to the Maine Department of Transportation’s downtown traffic project, a new disorderly house ordinance, the sale of an Old Ferry Road lot to Central Maine Power Co. for a new substation and a moratorium on recreational marijuana establishments.

The $9.4 million Wiscasset School Department budget with the estimated first payment of the energy project included was approved by an overwhelming majority, but the energy project was defeated 384-329.

“I’m surprised at the short-sightedness of voters,” Wiscasset School Committee member Jason Putnam said. “This is going to cost the town thousands in lost energy savings. Once again children are getting thrown under the bus.”

The results of the vote were “disappointing,” Superintendent Heather Wilmot said. “We have a large need to address our students’ learning environment. Doing it through energy savings would have been the most cost-effective way.”

A letter of intent was signed with Siemens Inc. when the energy audit of school buildings was conducted in 2016. The Wiscasset School Department must pay about $15,000 for the energy audit, which it would not have had to pay if the energy project was completed, Wilmot said.

The $69,500 that was incorporated into the school budget to cover the estimated first-year payment of the energy contract will

Article source: http://bangordailynews.com/2017/06/14/news/midcoast/wiscasset-voters-reject-school-energy-project-town-planners-budget/

Medical Marijuana Growing Facility Near Maine School Raises …

June 24th, 2017

A new medical marijuana growing facility in Richmond, Maine is less than 300 feet away from the high school and middle school — and town officials say it’s perfectly legal.

This spring, the Richmond planning board approved a permit for a grow operation at 150 Main Street, a building right next to the school entrance.

According to town records, Richmond’s attorney reviewed the permit request and determined that there was no legal basis for denying it. The medical marijuana law states that proximity to schools is only a consideration for dispensaries — and this operation is strictly a growing facility.

“It’s very difficult to explain to people why there’s a marijuana grow facility 300 feet from a school,” said Richmond Select Board Chair O’Neil LaPlante.

He said the town is “almost split 50-50,” with some concerned about the location of the grow site, and others seeing no problem with it.

The issue caught the attention of Rep. Seth Berry, (D-Bowdoinham), who has sponsored LD 1636, emergency legislation to give municipalities the authority to prohibit marijuana caregivers within 500 feet from a school.

“This will give the town some leverage,” said Rep. Berry, whose legislation has passed the House and Senate — and is now sitting on the Governor’s desk.

“A lot of parents were concerned, some law enforcement was concerned, and the entire select board wanting me to do something — so I have,” said Berry.

He said his legislation would impact future grow operations — but will not retroactively address the

Article source: http://www.necn.com/news/new-england/Medical-Marijuana-Growing-Facility-Near-Maine-School-Raises-Eyebrows-429977813.html

There’s still no state budget, but we do have a black widow spider

June 24th, 2017

With the last newsletter of the week, allow me to say Eid Mubarak.

Unfortunately, a threatening letter received by the Islamic Society on Portland Street earlier this week has cast something of a shadow over the end of Ramadan and upcoming Eid al-Fitr celebration, with Portland police saying today they’ll increase security at Muslim gathering places.

Thankfully, members of Portland’s Muslim community have told the Portland Press Herald they remain undaunted in the face of this unacceptable hatred, will continue worshipping and that they feel safe.

Here’s to a truly joyous Eid al-Fitr and a triumph over hatred..

Here are a few headlines you might be interested in.

What we’re talking about

Another week in the books, and the state still doesn’t have a two-year budget. If one isn’t in place by July 1, we’ll have our first state government shutdown since 1991. In your daily gridlock update, Republicans and Democrats are getting closer to agreement on education funding, but still have a sizable chasm on how to pay for it, as well as whether to push for a statewide teacher contract, as Gov. Paul LePage wants.

While cities like Portland have long been open and accepting of the LGBTQIA community, acceptance in rural communities has been slower to evolve. The BDN’s Abigail Curtis found that gay, lesbian and transgender farmers living and working in rural Maine have a wide range of experiences. A couple running a family farm in Morrill said they feel accepted in the community, while another source in

Article source: http://portland.bangordailynews.com/2017/06/23/news/theres-still-no-state-budget-but-we-do-have-a-black-widow-spider/

Arundel votes reflect growth in community

June 23rd, 2017

Voters in Arundel weigh in on one of 47 warrant articles during their annual town meeting, a two-hour session held Wednesday, June 14, in the Mildred L. Day School gymnasium. (Duke Harrington photo)Voters in Arundel weigh in on one of 47 warrant articles during their annual town meeting, a two-hour session held Wednesday, June 14, in the Mildred L. Day School gymnasium. (Duke Harrington photo)
ARUNDEL — Arundel is a small enough town that it still has a traditional New England-style town meeting, conducting all business – except elections to local office – at the annual session. But this year’s meeting made it clear the town is growing and on the move.

Nearly 100 residents gathered on Wednesday, June 14, in the gymnasium of the Mildred L. Day School to consider 47 warrant articles. Outside of setting the municipal budget, the most significant votes saw a clear majority of hands raised to OK spending $200,000 for a 6-acre parcel on Limerick Road — earmarked as site for a new town office — and $136,240 to have the York County Sheriff’s Office assign a second deputy to a full-time patrol beat in town.

During the course of the two-hour meeting, voters also approved $3.39 million in municipal spending for

Article source: http://post.mainelymediallc.com/news/2017-06-23/Community/Arundel_votes_reflect_growth_in_community.html

Medical Marijuana Growing Facility Near Maine School Raises Eyebrows

June 23rd, 2017

A new medical marijuana growing facility in Richmond, Maine is less than 300 feet away from the high school and middle school — and town officials say it’s perfectly legal.

This spring, the Richmond planning board approved a permit for a grow operation at 150 Main Street, a building right next to the school entrance.

According to town records, Richmond’s attorney reviewed the permit request and determined that there was no legal basis for denying it. The medical marijuana law states that proximity to schools is only a consideration for dispensaries — and this operation is strictly a growing facility.

“It’s very difficult to explain to people why there’s a marijuana grow facility 300 feet from a school,” said Richmond Select Board Chair O’Neil LaPlante.

He said the town is “almost split 50-50,” with some concerned about the location of the grow site, and others seeing no problem with it.

The issue caught the attention of Rep. Seth Berry, (D-Bowdoinham), who has sponsored LD 1636, emergency legislation to give municipalities the authority to prohibit marijuana caregivers within 500 feet from a school.

“This will give the town some leverage,” said Rep. Berry, whose legislation has passed the House and Senate — and is now sitting on the Governor’s desk.

“A lot of parents were concerned, some law enforcement was concerned, and the entire select board wanting me to do something — so I have,” said Berry.

He said his legislation would impact future grow operations — but will not retroactively address the

Article source: http://www.necn.com/news/new-england/Medical-Marijuana-Growing-Facility-Near-Maine-School-Raises-Eyebrows-429977813.html

South Portland Police Beat: June 23

June 22nd, 2017
  • Delicious

Arrests

6/3 at 3:11 a.m. Eric Tan, 31, of South Portland, was arrested on Westbrook Street by Officer Jacob LaChance on a charge of domestic violence assault.

6/3 at 3:29 p.m. Gary V. Moody, 52, of South Portland was arrested on Broadway by Officer Brian McCarthy on a change of public drinking.

6/4 at 11:12 a.m. Douglass A. Corbridge, 66, of South Portland, was arrested on Main Street by Office Philip Loganecker on an outstanding warrant from another agency and a charge of illegal attachment of license plates.

6/5 at 4:43 p.m. Sean T. Pippin, 28, of South Portland was arrested on Market Street by Officer Scott Study on an outstanding warrant from another agency.

6/6 at 11:35 a.m. Hanna L. Brown, 26, of South Portland, was arrested on Philbrook Avenue by Officer Steven Connors on an outstanding warrant from another agency and charges of  theft by unauthorized taking and violating conditions of release.

6/7 at 5:54 a.m. Dean Testa, 44, of South Portland, was arrested on North MacArthur Circle by Officer Kaitlyn Thurlow on a charge of domestic violence assault.

6/9 at 6:14 p.m. Kevin S. King, 55, of Waldoboro was arrested on Western Avenue by Officer Ryan Le on charges of refusing to submit to arrest or detention and violating conditions of release.

 Summonses

 6/3 at 7:26 p.m. Noah Paradis, 21, of Scarborough, was issued a summons on Scamman Street by Officer Kaitlyn Thurlow on a charge of violating conditions of release.

6/4 at 3:18 p.m. Judith Lappin, 74, of South Portland, was issued a summons on

Article source: http://www.theforecaster.net/south-portland-police-beat-june-23/

Topsham Police Beat: June 23

June 22nd, 2017
  • Delicious

Arrests

6/12 at 3:41 p.m. Nicholas Reilly, 20, of Sokokis Circle, was arrested by Sgt. Robert Ramsay on Sokokis Circle on a charge of terrorizing, and issued a summons on charges of possession of alcohol by a minor and possession of marijuana.

6/14 at 1:29 p.m. Terrill Parker, 45, of Norway, was arrested by Officer Gabrielle Mathieu on Cathance Road on a charge of operating after habitual offender license revocation.

Summonses

6/12 at 4:08 p.m. Carissa Chadbourne, 35, of Cushman Street, Portland, was issued a summons by Officer Lucas Shirland on Main Street on a charge of operating an unregistered motor vehicle more than 150 days.

6/18 at 12:19 a.m. Gerald Shoblock, 39, of Oak Grove Avenue, Bath, was issued a summons by Sgt. Robert Ramsay on Main Street on charges of unlawful possession of scheduled drugs, operating with a suspended registration and operating an unregistered motor vehicle.

6/18 at 11:22 a.m. James Thompson II, 68, of Boothbay Harbor, was issued a summons by Officer Lucas Shirland on Bypass Drive on a charge of operating an unregistered motor vehicle more than 150 days.

6/18 at 3:05 p.m. Laurie Britto, 60, of Pleasant Street, Lisbon Falls, was issued a summons by Officer Lucas Shirland on Lewiston Road on a charge of operating an unregistered motor vehicle more than 150 days.

Phoned it out

6/13 at 5:08 p.m. Sgt. Robert Ramsay responded to the report of a residential burglary on Tedford Road. The house had been entered earlier that day through an unlocked door and rummaged through,

Article source: http://www.theforecaster.net/topsham-police-beat-june-23-3/

South Portland Police Beat: June 23 – The Forecaster

June 22nd, 2017
  • Delicious

Arrests

6/3 at 3:11 a.m. Eric Tan, 31, of South Portland, was arrested on Westbrook Street by Officer Jacob LaChance on a charge of domestic violence assault.

6/3 at 3:29 p.m. Gary V. Moody, 52, of South Portland was arrested on Broadway by Officer Brian McCarthy on a change of public drinking.

6/4 at 11:12 a.m. Douglass A. Corbridge, 66, of South Portland, was arrested on Main Street by Office Philip Loganecker on an outstanding warrant from another agency and a charge of illegal attachment of license plates.

6/5 at 4:43 p.m. Sean T. Pippin, 28, of South Portland was arrested on Market Street by Officer Scott Study on an outstanding warrant from another agency. 

6/6 at 11:35 a.m. Hanna L. Brown, 26, of South Portland, was arrested on Philbrook Avenue by Officer Steven Connors on an outstanding warrant from another agency and charges of  theft by unauthorized taking and violating conditions of release.

6/7 at 5:54 a.m. Dean Testa, 44, of South Portland, was arrested on North MacArthur Circle by Officer Kaitlyn Thurlow on a charge of domestic violence assault. 

6/9 at 6:14 p.m. Kevin S. King, 55, of Waldoboro was arrested on Western Avenue by Officer Ryan Le on charges of refusing to submit to arrest or detention and violating conditions of release.

 Summonses

 6/3 at 7:26 p.m. Noah Paradis, 21, of Scarborough, was issued a summons on Scamman Street by Officer Kaitlyn Thurlow on a charge of violating conditions of release. 

6/4 at 3:18 p.m. Judith Lappin, 74, of South Portland, was issued a summons on

Article source: http://www.theforecaster.net/south-portland-police-beat-june-23/

Warren voters ban commercial pot, pass budget – By Beth A … – Courier

June 22nd, 2017

Warren — It took an hour and half for the approximately 70 attendees to approve Warren’s 2017-2018 municipal budget at town meeting June 20.

The $1,090,784 budget is up $46,329, or 4.2 percent, over last year.

Of the 35 articles on the warrant, the last two generated the most discussion: voting on whether or not to prohibit commercial marijuana activities, including, but not limited to, marijuana processing facilities, testing facilities, cultivation facilities, or retail businesses and social clubs; and discontinuing the use of a portion of Packard Mill Road.

On the marijuana article, Board of Selectman Chair Bill Lufkin said he would like to take the approach the town did when it was a dry town.

“Let’s just ban it completely, which would stop any of the commercial operations, then if down the road the townspeople decide ‘we could live with this,’ we could always get a petition put on the town warrant,” he said.

Planning Board Chair Joseph Berkenbile said the only way the town could gain from the commercial sales would be through fees, but he has not heard of anyone in town wanting to start a business.

A legal caregiver with more than 10 years’ experience spoke regarding the lack of attention his business has attracted.

“We do everything by the law, I pay my taxes, and I would hate to see an opportunity go down the drain,” he said.

Resident Brian Sawyer spoke out against the article, saying, “As a country, as a state, we’ve been behind the ball on

Article source: https://knox.villagesoup.com/p/warren-voters-ban-commercial-pot-pass-budget/1661780

Warren voters ban commercial pot, pass budget – Courier

June 21st, 2017

Warren — It took an hour and half for the approximately 70 attendees to approve Warren’s 2017-2018 municipal budget at town meeting June 20.

The $1,090,784 budget is up $46,329, or 4.2 percent, over last year.

Of the 35 articles on the warrant, the last two generated the most discussion: voting on whether or not to prohibit commercial marijuana activities, including, but not limited to, marijuana processing facilities, testing facilities, cultivation facilities, or retail businesses and social clubs; and discontinuing the use of a portion of Packard Mill Road.

On the marijuana article, Board of Selectman Chair Bill Lufkin said he would like to take the approach the town did when it was a dry town.

“Let’s just ban it completely, which would stop any of the commercial operations, then if down the road the townspeople decide ‘we could live with this,’ we could always get a petition put on the town warrant,” he said.

Planning Board Chair Joseph Berkenbile said the only way the town could gain from the commercial sales would be through fees, but he has not heard of anyone in town wanting to start a business.

A legal caregiver with more than 10 years’ experience spoke regarding the lack of attention his business has attracted.

“We do everything by the law, I pay my taxes, and I would hate to see an opportunity go down the drain,” he said.

Resident Brian Sawyer spoke out against the article, saying, “As a country, as a state, we’ve been behind the ball on

Article source: https://knox.villagesoup.com/p/warren-voters-ban-commercial-pot-pass-budget/1661780