Archive for May, 2017

Cumberland Police Beat: June 1

May 31st, 2017
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Arrests

5/17 at 10:33 p.m. Leslie Tar Jr., 45, of Lower Methodist Road, was arrested by Officer Antonio Ridge on Mountain Road in Falmouth on a charge of operating under the influence.

5/21 at 2:30 a.m. Nicholas Gagnon, 37, of Finn Parker Road, Gorham, was arrested by Officer Joseph Burke on Portland Road in Yarmouth on outstanding warrants from another agency, and a charge of violation of conditions of release.

Summonses

5/12 at 2:20 p.m. A 13-year-old male, of Cumberland, was issued a summons by Lt. Milton Calder on Tuttle Road on a charge of assault.

5/12 at 2:20 p.m. A 16-year-old male, of North Yarmouth, was issued a summons by Officer Benjamin Burnes on Greely Road Extension on a charge of illegal possession of alcohol by a minor.

5/19 at 12:59 a.m. Derek Dawes, 32, of James Way, Windham, was issued a summons by Officer Benjamin Burnes on Goose Pond Road on charges of failure to register a motor vehicle in more than 150 days, and obscure marks on a registration plate.

5/20 at 11:25 p.m. A 17-year-old male, of Cumberland, was issued a summons by Officer Joseph Burke on Greely Road Extension on a charge of illegal possession of marijuana.

Fire calls

5/20 at 5:10 p.m. Brush fire on Tuttle Road.

5/22 at 10:11 p.m. Flood assessment on Tuttle Road.

5/21 at 9:45 a.m. Smoke detector activation on Westmore Avenue.

5/21 at 9:57 a.m. Brush fire on Blackstrap Road.

5/22 at 11:55 p.m. Accident on Orchard Road.

5/23 at 2:07 p.m. Accident on Main Street.

5/23 at 4:07 p.m.

Article source: http://www.theforecaster.net/cumberland-police-beat-june-1-3/

Former meat plant in Androscoggin County to become cannabis operation

May 30th, 2017

The former Town Country Foods meat operation in Greene was listed on Instagram and sold within three days to a medical marijuana grower.

The Lewiston Sun Journal reported MECAP LLC bought the 8.2-acre property for $360,000 as an investment, then sold it again to Bangor-based Central Maine Flower Herbal Caregiving Services LLC, which describes itself online as specializing in growing hydroponic medicinal cannabis.

Ryan Aubin, a consultant who was answering the phone for Central Maine Flower, told the BDN the facility’s layout is ideal for growing medicinal cannabis, with a freezer building, floor drains and the ability to sterilize from the ceiling down.

Aubin told the Sun Journal that Central Maine Flower owner Benny Carrasco, a licensed medical marijuana caregiver, plans to expand his operation for the recreational marijuana market once those rules are established.

Article source: http://www.mainebiz.biz/article/20170530/NEWS0101/170539994

Lytle looks for a return to public service – Seacoast Online

May 30th, 2017

ELIOT, Maine — Two positions on the five-member Select Board are open this year.

The seats are currently held by chairman Rebecca Davis and member Roland Fernald. Fernald has chosen not to run again. Davis is running for re-election in the June 13 election with Richard Donhauser, Philip Lylte Sr. and Douglas Warrender

Seacoast Media Group asked the four candidates five questions.

Philip N. Lytle, Sr.

Family information: Wife Janice. Five children, 16 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.

Education: Marshwood Adult Ed Program; Dale Carnegie Course; the Maynard Research Center for Supervision course; public relations and public works and safety courses. Red Cross Emergency Management and Disaster Relief programs, courses and training sessions.

Occupation: Retired from Davidson Rubber/Textron /Collins and Akman, Company after 40 years. Retired from the town of Eliot as manager of the transfer station and solid waste facility after 13 years.

Elected/appointed/volunteer/positions served: Previous service on the Select Board. Budget Committee, Comprehensive Plan Review Committee, Solid Waste/Recycling Committee, Safety Committee, and the Board of Appeals. Boy Scout leader.

1. Why should voters elect you to the Eliot Select Board? 

I feel voters should have someone on the board that knows the town history and how it has developed over the years to what it is today.

2. An article on the June ballot would amend the Route 236 Tax Increment Financing District to remove some parcels from the current district and add some in the village center. This would put a focus on the development of social services and small businesses in the village. Do you support or oppose

Article source: http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/20170529/lytle-looks-for-return-to-public-service

Lytle looks for a return to public service

May 30th, 2017

ELIOT, Maine — Two positions on the five-member Select Board are open this year.

The seats are currently held by chairman Rebecca Davis and member Roland Fernald. Fernald has chosen not to run again. Davis is running for re-election in the June 13 election with Richard Donhauser, Philip Lylte Sr. and Douglas Warrender

Seacoast Media Group asked the four candidates five questions.

Philip N. Lytle, Sr.

Family information: Wife Janice. Five children, 16 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.

Education: Marshwood Adult Ed Program; Dale Carnegie Course; the Maynard Research Center for Supervision course; public relations and public works and safety courses. Red Cross Emergency Management and Disaster Relief programs, courses and training sessions.

Occupation: Retired from Davidson Rubber/Textron /Collins and Akman, Company after 40 years. Retired from the town of Eliot as manager of the transfer station and solid waste facility after 13 years.

Elected/appointed/volunteer/positions served: Previous service on the Select Board. Budget Committee, Comprehensive Plan Review Committee, Solid Waste/Recycling Committee, Safety Committee, and the Board of Appeals. Boy Scout leader.

1. Why should voters elect you to the Eliot Select Board? 

I feel voters should have someone on the board that knows the town history and how it has developed over the years to what it is today.

2. An article on the June ballot would amend the Route 236 Tax Increment Financing District to remove some parcels from the current district and add some in the village center. This would put a focus on the development of social services and small businesses in the village. Do you support or oppose

Article source: http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/20170529/lytle-looks-for-return-to-public-service

Maine voters approved 4 laws in 2016. Here’s where they stand

May 28th, 2017

Maine voters thought they approved sweeping changes to the state’s rules on marijuana, taxes, voting and the minimum wage when they went to the polls last year.

But think again.

The four referendums have hit roadblocks as Republican Gov. Paul LePage, the state Legislature and the courts have weighed in. The final rule changes could be very different from the proposals voters approved in November.

Maine’s Constitution makes clear that the referendums are like any other law. But just like any other law, they can be taken off the books, said Marshall Tinkle, a Portland attorney and author of “The Maine State Constitution.”

“But I would say it’s politically dicey when people of Maine decide that they want something, and the governor or the Legislature decide they just don’t want to implement it,” he added.

VOTING FIGHT

The state’s adoption of the country’s first “ranked-choice” voting system came under fire this week when the Maine Supreme Judicial Court unanimously concluded the election overhaul conflicts with the Maine Constitution. Lawmakers who are considering whether to implement the system or get rid of it altogether requested the court opinion.

The referendum was designed to allow residents to rank their ballot choices from first to last in a system that ensures a candidate wins majority support. Supporters say it weeds out the possibility of “spoiler” candidates.

A Democratic lawmaker wants to change the law to address the court’s concerns and propose the revised measure as a constitutional amendment. Rep. Heather Sirocki, R-Scarborough, and other Republican opponents of

Article source: http://www.pressherald.com/2017/05/26/maine-voters-approved-4-laws-in-2016-heres-where-they-stand/

As Maine towns face sticky issues raised by recreational pot, some just say no

May 26th, 2017

The vote in Lebanon wasn’t overwhelming, but the message was clear.

Residents voted “No” on six referendum questions this month, prohibiting all varieties of recreational cannabis businesses and making the rural York County town the first in southern Maine to become a “dry town” in a state with newly legalized recreational marijuana.


photo-storephoto-store

York is holding a similar referendum Saturday and could join Lebanon on a small but growing list of Maine towns considering closing the door on the new legal marijuana market that is expected to launch next year, after lawmakers set up a regulatory system to oversee the industry.

“It’s the most clear-cut, unambiguous action a town can take,” said Ted Kelleher, an attorney with Drummond Woodsum who leads a practice group focusing on highly regulated markets, including marijuana. “It avoids the need to have to face a lot of the other more complicated, difficult questions about where you would permit these stores and how many you would allow.”

Municipal officials across the state are grappling with the impact that retail marijuana could have on their communities. Even with the uncertainty of how state regulations will work, town officials are wading through a host of issues, from developing local zoning and licensing to deciding on appropriate regulations for things like odor and signs.

Dozens of communities – from the largest cities in southern Maine to small towns in rural counties – have passed temporary moratoriums banning marijuana businesses while officials hammer out those details. Now,

Article source: http://www.pressherald.com/2017/05/20/lebanon-voters-reject-recreational-pot-commerce/

Bangor company buys 8.2 acres to grow recreational marijuana in …

May 26th, 2017

GREENE, Maine — A Bangor-based company has bought the shuttered Town Country Foods with long-term plans to grow recreational marijuana in the former 13,340-square-foot former meat operation.

“I sold it actually from a social media post,” broker Kevin Fletcher at Malone Commercial Brokers said Tuesday. After announcing the listing on Instagram in March, “it was under contract in two or three days.”

MECAP LLC bought the 8.2 acre property for $360,000 as an investment, then turned around and sold it, owner-financed, to Central Maine Flower Herbal Caregiving Services LLC, Fletcher said.

Central Maine Flower describes itself online as “growers who specialize in the growing of hydroponic medicinal cannabis.”

Ryan Aubin, who operates the consulting service Ryan the Grower and answered the phone for Central Maine Flower this week, said the Greene facility appealed to Central Maine Flower owner Benny Carrasco for its layout.

“You don’t see options like that happen — freezer buildings that are spray-proof and have drains on the floor kind of meet every grower’s dream,” Aubin said. “It saved a lot of money and upfront cost. Everything is sterilizable from the ceiling on down. That’s something a lot of people can’t do at their home facilities because of Sheetrock, or it’s in a basement. If you do have a mold outbreak or something like that on the crop, you can limit it.”

Aubin estimated it would take until February to build out the facility. Carrasco, a licensed medical marijuana caregiver, will move his plants from Bangor with an eye toward

Article source: http://bangordailynews.com/2017/05/25/business/bangor-company-buys-8-2-acres-to-grow-recreational-marijuana-in-greene/

Bangor company buys 8.2 acres to grow recreational marijuana in Greene

May 25th, 2017

GREENE, Maine — A Bangor-based company has bought the shuttered Town Country Foods with long-term plans to grow recreational marijuana in the former 13,340-square-foot former meat operation.

“I sold it actually from a social media post,” broker Kevin Fletcher at Malone Commercial Brokers said Tuesday. After announcing the listing on Instagram in March, “it was under contract in two or three days.”

MECAP LLC bought the 8.2 acre property for $360,000 as an investment, then turned around and sold it, owner-financed, to Central Maine Flower Herbal Caregiving Services LLC, Fletcher said.

Central Maine Flower describes itself online as “growers who specialize in the growing of hydroponic medicinal cannabis.”

Ryan Aubin, who operates the consulting service Ryan the Grower and answered the phone for Central Maine Flower this week, said the Greene facility appealed to Central Maine Flower owner Benny Carrasco for its layout.

“You don’t see options like that happen — freezer buildings that are spray-proof and have drains on the floor kind of meet every grower’s dream,” Aubin said. “It saved a lot of money and upfront cost. Everything is sterilizable from the ceiling on down. That’s something a lot of people can’t do at their home facilities because of Sheetrock, or it’s in a basement. If you do have a mold outbreak or something like that on the crop, you can limit it.”

Aubin estimated it would take until February to build out the facility. Carrasco, a licensed medical marijuana caregiver, will move his plants from Bangor with an eye toward

Article source: http://bangordailynews.com/2017/05/25/business/bangor-company-buys-8-2-acres-to-grow-recreational-marijuana-in-greene/

Kittery Council tackles new pot rules

May 23rd, 2017

KITTERY, Maine – Residents offered their opinions on proposed medical and recreational marijuana use regulations at the Town Council meeting Monday.

The proposed ordinance changes add definitions for terms related to both medicinal and recreational marijuana to Article 16 of the Kittery town code to recognize the cultivation, manufacturing, distribution and testing as permitted uses for both recreational and medicinal purposes.

The council also passed two other ordinances for the home occupation standards for medical marijuana caregivers, by banning it as a minor home occupation, and permitting it as a major home occupation. As a major home occupation, caregivers in Kittery will have to apply for annual occupancy permits from the code enforcement officer to ensure they are not producing obnoxious odors or other negative social impacts to neighbors. The sale of retail marijuana was banned as a home occupation under the new ordinance.

“We discovered when the ballot initiative passed in November … that our code is clearly not set up to address recreational marijuana, but we also hadn’t addressed medical marijuana,” said Town Manager Kendra Amaral. “As we were looking to see what we needed to do, to first of all, make sure we have control of what’s going on now, but also give ourselves some time to really develop thorough ordinances that accomplish what we as a community really want to accomplish.”

The Town Council passed the first two ordinances unanimously. However, when it came to passing a medical marijuana

Article source: http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/20170522/kittery-council-tackles-new-pot-rules

All about pot: Rockport forum about local execution of new state law

May 22nd, 2017

The Town of Rockport will be holding a marijuana forum Thursday, May 25, to better understand the new state law and what it means to municipalities.  Some of the topics that will be discussed:

  • What are other municipalities doing?
  • What makes towns a special case?
  • How does a town deal with this issue when the vote was so close?
  • What is the definition of social club, etc.?
  • What is the town’s responsibility with regard to growth and selling?

The forum will take place at 7 p.m. in the Rockport Opera House Meeting room with the Select Board, Planning Board, Ordinance Review Committee, Zoning Board of Appeals, and others. It will be streamed live at livestream.com/Rockportmaine/events/7408793

Speakers will include Maine legislators, Paul McCarrier, who heads up Legalize Maine, and Phil Saucier, an attorney with Bernstein, Shur, Sawyer and Nelson.

The2016 citizens initiative allows recreational consumption of pot, but it is still not legal for you to buy or sell pot, unless you are a medical patient.

The citizens’ initiative allowed for nine months of rule- and regulation-making that began Jan 30. That nine-month timeframe was extended by the Legislature an extra three months so the anticipated start date for legal sales of recreational marijuana is Feb 1, 2018.

Read more: What you need to know about Maine’s new marijuana law, effective Jan. 30

 

 

 

 

Article source: http://www.penbaypilot.com/article/all-about-pot-rockport-forum-about-local-execution-new-state-law/86543