Archive for November, 2016

Warehouse owners in several states cash in on marijuana prospects

November 30th, 2016

It took Chris Abbott six stressful months to find a new space for his growing company. The 10,000-square-foot warehouse on the outskirts of Portland, Oregon, was once used to store industrial-strength compressors. Now the gritty space, its cinder walls repainted white, resembles a cross between a high-end laboratory and an industrial bakery. It’s the home of Botanica, Abbott’s edible marijuana company.

The new lease, which will let Botanica expand its business from nearby Washington into the Beaver state, didn’t come cheap. In the Portland area, most companies can rent industrial space for about $5 a square foot annually. Cannabis companies, however, pay a premium ranging from $12 to $18 a square foot.

The real estate industry sees a potential windfall in leasing warehouse space to marijuana growers in states that have approved the use of recreational marijuana.The real estate industry sees a potential windfall in leasing warehouse space to marijuana growers in states that have approved the use of recreational marijuana.


photo-storephoto-store

“We were willing to pay above-market value to have a space there,” Abbott said. “I see the biggest barrier to entry in Oregon as getting real estate.”

The short history of legalized marijuana in the U.S. is rife with tales of tight supply and above-market leases. Local rules on where cannabis businesses can operate, combined with restrictions that prevent them from using bank financing, have limited the property available to entrepreneurs such as Abbott.

A NEW KIND OF

Article source: http://www.pressherald.com/2016/11/30/warehouse-owners-in-several-states-cash-in-on-marijuana-prospects/

Another View: Attorney general pick Sessions should let states decide on pot

November 30th, 2016

President-elect Donald Trump’s nomination of Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., to be attorney general of the United States rightly has proponents of marijuana legalization troubled.

Sessions, who at an April congressional hearing remarked that “good people don’t smoke marijuana,” and joked in the past that he thought members of the Ku Klux Klan were “OK until I found out they smoked pot,” is a hard-line drug warrior at a time when most of the nation has signaled a willingness to permit marijuana use.

Recent public opinion polls have shown a majority of Americans support legalization, including polls conducted by Gallup and Pew Research finding 60 percent and 57 percent in support, respectively. An additional Gallup poll reported 13 percent of American adults identify as current marijuana users – bad people, according to Sessions – and 43 percent of adults have tried marijuana in their lifetimes.

While concerns over the abuse of marijuana, or any substance for that matter, are perfectly valid, it is clear that growing numbers of Americans are no longer convinced that prohibition and criminalization are justifiable approaches to the issue.

In fact, we now live in a nation where 29 states plus the District of Columbia have legalized marijuana for medicinal purposes, and eight states plus the District of Columbia have legalized marijuana for recreational purposes, despite marijuana officially being illegal under federal law.

On Election Day, four states – California, Maine, Massachusetts and Nevada – voted to legalize recreational marijuana. An additional three states – Arkansas, Florida and North Dakota – voted

Article source: http://www.pressherald.com/2016/11/26/another-view-ag-pick-sessions-should-let-states-decide-on-pot/

Duane Cloutier

November 30th, 2016

Duane Cloutier joined the Waterville Police Department in 2003 after working as a machinist at Mid-State Machine Products in Winslow while raising a family.

Back then, the drugs he saw while working as a night patrol officer were mostly marijuana and cocaine.

Now he’s the sole city detective who focuses on drug cases in the department. The problem has changed to opiates, which are more addictive, he said. Deaths from drug overdoses now average one per day in Maine, mostly from opiates, according to recent statistics from the state attorney general’s office.

Cloutier said a key reason he does this work is because he sees more children and parents dying now. He wants to help them, to save lives.

“You do everything you can do to help them, but I don’t know,” he said. “You know, that definitely drives me, because that just makes me want to get the source that much more.”

Cloutier, 46, said he sees a lot of what already has been described in the epidemic: People get addicted to painkillers, then switch to heroin, a cheaper option that’s “the same exact drug.”

When these drugs become a problem in a community, there are tell-tale signs, he said. Police see pharmacy robberies and increases in thefts as addicts struggle to find a fix. Then they start dying from overdoses, especially when drugs such as fentanyl and acetyl fentanyl, synthetic opioid medications that are dozens of times stronger than heroin, seep into communities.

Cloutier often wears hoodies instead of

Article source: http://www.centralmaine.com/2016/11/24/duane-cloutier/

Damariscotta Police Break Up Underage Party, Arrest Two

November 30th, 2016

Timothy Jordan

Timothy Jordan

Damariscotta police officers arrested two men and summonsed three other people after breaking up a party involving alleged underage drinking and drug use on Church Street on Thanksgiving, Thursday, Nov. 24.

Timothy Jordan, 54, of Damariscotta, was charged with class D allowing a minor to possess or consume liquor, class D furnishing liquor to a minor, and class E violation of condition of release, all misdemeanors; and possession of marijuana, a civil infraction, according to Damariscotta Police Chief Ron Young.

Jesse Cogar, 20, of Bristol, was charged with class C aggravated furnishing of scheduled drugs, a felony; class D unlawful furnishing of a scheduled drug, a misdemeanor; and minor consuming liquor, a civil infraction.

Police arrested Cogar and Jordan.

Jesse Cogar

Jesse Cogar

Ethan Murray, 19, of Newcastle, received a civil summons for possession of marijuana, Young said. Jordan Smerdon, 20, of Bristol, was charged with class D unlawful furnishing of scheduled drug, as well as the civil infraction of minor consuming liquor.

A 17-year-old female juvenile from Damariscotta also received a civil summons for minor consuming liquor, Young said.

Officers Jim Dotson and Kyle Sylvester responded to 63 Church St. at 10:15 p.m. after receiving an anonymous complaint about underage drinking and marijuana use, Young said.

When the officers arrived, they could smell the alcohol and marijuana, Young said.

The officers knocked on the door and were let in by Jordan, who lives at the residence. Once inside, the officers found

Article source: http://lcnme.com/courts/damariscotta-police-break-underage-party-arrest-two/

Opponents of Maine tax hike on high earners withdraw recount – Bryan

November 29th, 2016

Posted: Tuesday, November 29, 2016 3:13 pm
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Updated: 3:33 pm, Tue Nov 29, 2016.

Opponents of Maine tax hike on high earners withdraw recount

Associated Press |


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Article source: http://www.theeagle.com/news/nation/opponents-of-maine-tax-hike-on-high-earners-withdraw-recount/article_80ac3bac-7813-59d9-873d-f5f6de78b59f.html

Sens. Susan Collins, Angus King look to strengthen border with Canada

November 29th, 2016

Maine’s U.S. senators are pushing for greater security along the Canadian border.

A measure aimed at strengthening the 5,500-mile-long border recently passed the U.S. Senate without dissent and is now in the hands of the U.S. House, which may act before the current session ends next month. It has already backed a similar bill.

“Maine law enforcement officers and border patrol agents are the first line of defense in maintaining the security of our border with Canada and protecting Maine from threats,” said Maine’s two senators, Susan Collins and Angus King, in a joint statement.

They said the proposal they co-sponsored would help officials understand “the northern border’s needs, strengths and vulnerabilities.”

The Northern Border Security Review Act “will play a significant role in bolstering our border security, supporting law enforcement and keeping Maine citizens safe,” Collins and King said in the statement. Maine’s border with Canada is 611 miles long, nearly all of it sparsely populated.

The Congressional Budget Office estimated the bill would cost about $1 million to implement and would not have any impact on state or local spending.

A 2015 report from the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee found that there are about 5,700 Border Patrol and other federal officers along the Canadian border.

But, it said, “Due to the large size of the border and the relatively small number of agents patrolling it, drug smugglers and other traffickers have been able to move illicit goods across the northern border in both directions. For instance, cocaine from South America travels north

Article source: http://www.sunjournal.com/news/maine/2016/11/29/maines-senators-look-defend-border-canada/2037321

Maine town mulls ‘dry town’ designation to block pot sales, clubs

November 29th, 2016

Article source: http://www.wlbz2.com/news/local/maine-town-mulls-dry-town-designation-to-block-pot-sales-clubs/355863112

Maine Legalization Recount Scheduled to Start Dec. 1 – Freedom Leaf

November 29th, 2016

Opponents of Maine’s Question 1 have requested a recount after a close race. The state’s marijuana legalization measure was part of a wave of successful initiatives around the country on Election Day. It won by just 2,620 votes.

According to Ballotpedia, a non-partisan site that covers ballot initiatives, the recount will cost $500,000, and the state covers all costs if the margin is less than 1.5%. The recount, set to begin on December 1, could take six weeks or more, reports WABI.

But the costs of the effort are being shared by another recount, on Question 2, a ballot initiative that would make individuals earning more than $200,000 a year pay an extra 3% in taxes. It won by 6,117 votes.

Unless the recount reveals that the Question 1 count was wrong, it will be legal for adults over 21-years-old to possess less than 2.5 ounces of cannabis on January 7. While the measure also legalizes sales, it could take a year for the state to set up its adult-use market.

While the fight for legalization in Maine has drawn less interest than larger markets like Massachusetts and California, it’s still an important milestone for a region that lacked any adult-use states prior to the election.

“The Maine market is extremely exciting because they’ve done a very good job developing their medical marijuana market,” states Leslie Bocskor, president of cannabis consulting firm Electrum Partners, in an interview with VolteFace on legalization in the Northeast. The medical marijuana program in Maine has

Article source: http://www.freedomleaf.com/maine-legalization-recount-scheduled-start-dec-1/

Maine Legalization Recount Scheduled to Start Dec. 1

November 28th, 2016

Opponents of Maine’s Question 1 have requested a recount after a close race. The state’s marijuana legalization measure was part of a wave of successful initiatives around the country on Election Day. It won by just 2,620 votes.

According to Ballotpedia, a non-partisan site that covers ballot initiatives, the recount will cost $500,000, and the state covers all costs if the margin is less than 1.5%. The recount, set to begin on December 1, could take six weeks or more, reports WABI.

But the costs of the effort are being shared by another recount, on Question 2, a ballot initiative that would make individuals earning more than $200,000 a year pay an extra 3% in taxes. It won by 6,117 votes.

Unless the recount reveals that the Question 1 count was wrong, it will be legal for adults over 21-years-old to possess less than 2.5 ounces of cannabis on January 7. While the measure also legalizes sales, it could take a year for the state to set up its adult-use market.

While the fight for legalization in Maine has drawn less interest than larger markets like Massachusetts and California, it’s still an important milestone for a region that lacked any adult-use states prior to the election.

“The Maine market is extremely exciting because they’ve done a very good job developing their medical marijuana market,” states Leslie Bocskor, president of cannabis consulting firm Electrum Partners, in an interview with VolteFace on legalization in the Northeast. The medical marijuana program in Maine has

Article source: http://www.freedomleaf.com/maine-legalization-recount-scheduled-start-dec-1/

Maine ballot question recounts could take 4 to 6 weeks – Bryan

November 28th, 2016

Posted: Monday, November 28, 2016 10:49 am

Maine ballot question recounts could take 4 to 6 weeks

Associated Press |


0 comments

AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — The Maine Department of the Secretary of State says recounts of a pair of ballot questions will likely take four to six weeks.

Article source: http://www.theeagle.com/news/nation/maine-ballot-question-recounts-could-take-to-weeks/article_45730c82-cf3a-58f4-8544-64592fd3e200.html