Archive for December, 2015

Scarborough Police Beat: Jan. 1

December 31st, 2015
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Arrests

12/24 at 5:29 p.m. Matthew A. Hodgdon, 59, of Grover Hill Road, Mason Township, was arrested on U.S. Route 1 by Officer Brian McNeice on a charge of operating under the influence. 

12/25 at 9:14 p.m. Susan L. Reynolds, 21, of New Colony Drive, Old Orchard Beach, was arrested on U.S. Route 1 by Officer Brian McNeice on charges of operating under the influence, driving to endanger, operating with a suspended or revoked license and violating conditions of release. 

12/27 at 2:19 a.m. Adam M. Wilcox, 21, of Old Orchard Beach Road, Old Orchard Beach, was arrested at U.S. Route 1 and Millbrook Road by Officer Melissa DiClemente on charges of violating conditions of release, operating with a suspended or revoked license and failure to disclose a concealed weapon. 

Summonses

12/24 at 9:27 p.m. Rin Ann, 34, of Dunstan Landing Road, was issued a summons on Dunstan Landing Road by Officer Travis Hon on a charge of operating an unregistered vehicle for 150 days or more.

12/25 at 6:17 p.m. Darren T. Volkay, 43, of Wakefield Road, West Newfield, was issued a summons on Gorham Road by Officer Brian McNeice on a charge of operating an unregistered vehicle for 150 days or more. 

12/26 at 10:15 p.m. Sarah K. Vandegraaf, 33, of East Grand Avenue, Old Orchard Beach, was issued a summons on U.S. Route 1 by Officer Travis Hon on charges of operating with suspended registration and operating with a suspended or revoked license. 

12/27 at 12:16 a.m. A 17-year-old male, of Old Orchard Beach, was issued a summons

Article source: http://www.theforecaster.net/scarborough-police-beat-jan-1/

Autopsy details physical state of man in Bangor shooting – WLBZ

December 29th, 2015

Autopsy details physical state of man in Bangor shooting.
WLBZ

Article source: http://www.wlbz2.com/story/news/2015/12/18/autopsy-details-physical-state-of-man-in-bangor-shooting/77604018/

BC-ME–Maine News Digest 6 pm, ME

December 29th, 2015

Upcoming Maine news from The Associated Press for Monday, Dec. 28, 2015.

Good evening. Here’s a look at how AP’s general news coverage is shaping up today in Maine. Questions about today’s coverage plans are welcome, and should be directed to Maine Correspondent David Sharp at (207) 772-4157 or dsharp@ap.org., or Northern New England Correspondent Rik Stevens at 603-224-3327 or rstevens@ap.org

A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking news and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories, digests and digest advisories will keep you up to date.

Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNows.

TOP STORIES:

WINTER LOBSTERS

PORTLAND, Maine Many New England lobstermen are still fishing deep into December this year because of unseasonably warm weather and an abundance of the critters, and Maine’s beloved scallops are a little harder to come by as a result. The extra fishing hasn’t done much to change the price of lobsters, which are selling in the range of $8 to $10 per pound in Maine, typical for this time of year, when Canada is also hauling in large catches. But some lobstermen in Maine, the biggest lobster-producing state, also fish for scallops and haven’t made the transition to the winter scalloping season because lobster fishing is still strong. By Patrick Whittle. SENT: 445 words.

NORTHEAST SNOW

CONCORD, N.H. After what’s

Article source: http://www.whig.com/article/20151228/AP/312289804

BC-ME–Maine News Digest 1:30 pm, ME

December 28th, 2015

Upcoming Maine news from The Associated Press for Monday, Dec. 28, 2015.

Good evening. Here’s a look at how AP’s general news coverage is shaping up today in Maine. Questions about today’s coverage plans are welcome, and should be directed to Maine Correspondent David Sharp at (207) 772-4157 or dsharp@ap.org., or Northern New England Correspondent Rik Stevens at 603-224-3327 or rstevens@ap.org

A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking news and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories, digests and digest advisories will keep you up to date.

Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNows.

TOP STORIES:

WINTER LOBSTERS

PORTLAND, Maine Many New England lobstermen are still fishing deep into December this year because of unseasonably warm weather and an abundance of the critters, and Maine’s beloved scallops are a little harder to come by as a result. The extra fishing hasn’t done much to change the price of lobsters, which are selling in the range of $8 to $10 per pound in Maine, typical for this time of year, when Canada is also hauling in large catches. But some lobstermen in Maine, the biggest lobster-producing state, also fish for scallops and haven’t made the transition to the winter scalloping season because lobster fishing is still strong. By Patrick Whittle. SENT: 445 words.

NORTHEAST SNOW

CONCORD, N.H. After what’s

Article source: http://www.whig.com/article/20151228/AP/312289804

BC-ME–Maine News Coverage Advisory 8:30 am, ME

December 28th, 2015

The article requested cannot be found! Please refresh your browser or go back. (WH,20151228,AP,312289903,AR).

Herald-Whig

Drugs, Augusta slayings, North Pond Hermit lead top local stories

December 27th, 2015

Whether it was the record number of 54 meth labs destroyed by drug agents, the soaring rates of accidental overdoses on heroin often laced with fentanyl or the regular raids that uncovered large amounts of heroin, cocaine and crack, drugs dominated the headlines in 2015.

Those who are charged with fighting back say illegal drug activity poses a real threat to the state’s societal and economic health.


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“People are worried,” Dr. Wendy Wolf, president of the Maine Health Access Foundation said recently. “People are worried this is going to affect their families.”

That fear was palpable at last month’s public forum in Gardiner to discuss the ongoing drug crisis. Police Chief James Toman recalled a routine traffic stop on Brunswick Avenue in October that revealed “three guns, $11,000 in cash, over 70 needles, heroin and cocaine.” Toman said during the Nov. 10 forum that police have covered five deaths from drug overdoses — one woman and four men, ages 29 to 37.

“The number could be higher if not for (Fire and Ambulance) Chief Al Nelson’s crew, who have successfully resuscitated at least three people in Gardiner,” Toman said. “This is not just a Gardiner issue. This is a New England issue. This is a United States issue. This is an everywhere issue.”

Nelson said Gardiner crews responded to 53 drug overdoses in the nine communities it serves; 23 of those overdoses were in Gardiner.

He said rescue crews used Narcan 17 times. Narcan is an

Article source: https://www.centralmaine.com/2015/12/27/drugs-augusta-slaying-north-pond-hermit-lead-top-local-stories/

Maine weighs how to address drivers impaired by marijuana

December 27th, 2015

LEWISTON, Maine — As advocates for legal marijuana close in on a signature-gathering campaign likely to force a statewide ballot question in 2016, Maine lawmakers, law enforcement officers and elected officials are more seriously contemplating the broader implications of what legal weed would look in the Pine Tree State.

Topping their concerns is a possible increase in the number of drivers who will be impaired by the mind-altering drug when they get behind the wheel.

A growing body of research on the impact of marijuana use and motor vehicle accidents, including fatal crashes, suggests marijuana-related fatalities are on the rise. Nationally, they have increased from about 6 percent of all fatalities to nearly 12 percent. And while officials warn that some of that uptick is better testing, it’s also an indicator that marijuana use is having an impact on highway safety.

But unlike alcohol — on which a driver who has a blood-alcohol content of more than 0.08 percent is deemed legally impaired under state law — there is no physical standard to judge marijuana impairment.

Police also have no easy way to test drivers at the roadside for marijuana impairment. The technology that allows police to reliably sample a driver’s blood-alcohol content with a breath test doesn’t exist for marijuana. A more invasive and time-consuming blood test or urine test, which can often take weeks to return from a lab, is necessary.

In the end, those who choose to toke up on pot or chow down on marijuana-laced food products face the same penalties

Article source: https://bangordailynews.com/2015/12/27/news/state/maine-weighs-marijuana-and-highway-safety/?ref=moreInstate

Maine weighs marijuana and highway safety

December 27th, 2015

LEWISTON — As advocates for legal marijuana close in on a signature-gathering campaign likely to force a statewide ballot question in 2016, Maine lawmakers, law enforcement officers and elected officials are more seriously contemplating the broader implications of what legal weed would look in the Pine Tree State.

It produces a dreamy state of mind and creates the illusion that your senses are sharper than ever. While it’s true that your attention becomes focused, you actually become preoccupied with unusual thoughts or visions, not the road.

That “spaced out” feeling alters your sense of time and space, making it difficult to make quick decisions, judge distances and speed, and causes slow, disconnected thoughts, poor memory and paranoia.

Even hours after the effect is gone, this inability to deal with the unexpected lingers.

Description of the effect marijuana use has on a driver, according to the Maine Bureau of Highway Safety

Topping their concerns is a possible increase in the number of drivers who will be impaired by the mind-altering drug when they get behind the wheel.

A growing body of research on the impact of marijuana use and motor vehicle accidents, including fatal crashes, suggests marijuana-related fatalities are on the rise. Nationally, they have increased from about 6 percent of all fatalities to nearly 12 percent. And while officials warn that some of that uptick is better testing, it’s also an indicator that marijuana use is having an impact on highway safety.

But unlike alcohol — on which a driver who has a

Article source: http://www.sunjournal.com/news/maine/2015/12/27/maine-weighs-marijuana-and-highway-safety/1836574

AP-ME–Maine News Digest 6 pm, ME

December 25th, 2015

Upcoming Maine news from The Associated Press for Friday, Dec. 18, 2015.

Good evening. Here’s a look at how AP’s general news coverage is shaping up today in Maine. Questions about today’s coverage plans are welcome, and should be directed to Maine Correspondent David Sharp at (207) 772-4157 or dsharp@ap.org., or Northern New England Correspondent Rik Stevens at 603-224-3327 or rstevens@ap.org

A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking news and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories, digests and digest advisories will keep you up to date.

Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNows.

UPCOMING TOMORROW:

DELAYED WINTER-WILDLIFE

MONTPELIER, Vt. A look at how the lack of snow and cold in the Northeast is affecting wildlife. It’s delayed hibernation for some black bears, prompting Vermont officials to warn residents to wait for snow before putting out bird feeders to avoid attracting bears. By Lisa Rathke. UPCOMING: 400 words, photo.

TOP STORIES:

UMAINE COACH

PORTLAND, Maine The new football coach at the University of Maine is the youngest in Division I. But 29-year-old Joe Harasymiak is too busy recruiting to muse about his success at a young age. After winning the job, Harasymiak began recruiting in the Middle Atlantic. By David Sharp. SENT: 530 words.

MEDICAL MARIJUANA LAWSUIT

PORTLAND, Maine A New Hampshire cancer patient

Article source: http://www.whig.com/article/20151218/AP/312189568

Corinth man, 19, faces multiple charges after crash

December 25th, 2015

A Corinth man was charged with numerous offenses Wednesday night after he crashed a car he’d bought earlier in the day during a chase with Waterville police.

Dylan M. Caruso, 19, was charged with eluding an officer, operating a vehicle without a license, driving to endanger, driving 30 mph over the speed limit, two counts of unlawful possession of scheduled drugs, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, operation of a defective vehicle and attaching false plates, police said.

DYLAN CARUSODYLAN CARUSO


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Caruso was the only occupant of the car. He told officers that he fled because he didn’t have a license, the license plates he was using were not registered to the car and he had several warrants out for his arrest, according to Waterville Deputy Chief Charles Rumsey.

Police found more than 20 grams of marijuana, a digital scale, a glass pipe with marijuana residue and two non-narcotic prescription drugs in Caruso’s backpack, Rumsey said.

He was taken to the Kennebec County jail in Augusta and held on $4,000 bail.

The incident began Wednesday evening when a patrol officer saw a Ford Focus with an expired registration at the Elm Plaza shopping center at approximately 5:45 p.m.

When the officer attempted to pull the car over on upper Main Street, Caruso began driving erratically and sped onto Interstate 95 heading north, police said. The Waterville officer and a Maine State Police patrol vehicle chased the vehicle, according to

Article source: http://www.pressherald.com/2015/12/24/corinth-man-19-faces-multiple-charges-after-crash/