Archive for February, 2013

Our View: State and federal law should be aligned on medical pot

February 28th, 2013

February 24

Our View: State and federal law should be aligned on medical pot

A wink from federal prosecutors is not enough to protect the legal rights of Maine patients.

The disconnect between federal law and state law when it comes to marijuana was on display again recently in a lawsuit filed by a Pittsfield woman who says she lost her job for receiving medical care.

Brittany Thomas alleges that she was refused rehire following a layoff when she failed a urine test for marijuana. Thomas is a registered medical marijuana user under state law.

Thomas, who suffers from extreme back pain, came to marijuana after finding narcotic painkillers to have too many side effects, including potential addiction. An irony of this case is that Thomas would not have lost her job if she had been using Food and Drug Administration-approved opiates, even though those drugs would be far more disruptive to her performance on the job.

The problem Thomas and other medical marijuana users face is that while the substance has been cleared for therapeutic use in Maine and 15 other states, it is still illegal under federal law.

Not that anyone is worried about prosecution. The U.S. Department of Justice has all but said that it would not go after medical marijuana users or suppliers in states where it is legal, and Washington state officials say the U.S. attorney general has all but absolved them from prosecution as they set up a first-in-the-nation recreational marijuana program that was approved by voters last

Article source: http://www.pressherald.com/opinion/state-and-federal-law-should-be-aligned-on-medical-pot_2013-02-24.html

North Berwick police log

February 28th, 2013



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Article source: http://www.fosters.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20130228/GJNEWS_01/130229217/-1/FOSNEWS

Maine Bill’s Proposed Fetal Exposure Guidelines Generate Controversy

February 28th, 2013

The bills’ sponsor is Rep. Richard Malaby of Hancock, who recounted a story about a woman he met on the campaign trail who he says raised his awareness of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome – or NAS. 

“An elderly woman came up to me and said, ‘Do you know what I do?’  And I said, ‘No ma’am.’  And she said, ‘I’m a hugger. I go to Eastern Maine Medical Center and hold these NAS babies a couple days a week.  And furthermore, when I do that, the parents come in, and the parents often-times are addicted.’  And she noted, so too, frequently, are the grandparents.  And I thought, ‘Good for her.  Bad for us,'” Malaby recalled.

In 2005, The number of drug-affected Maine babies was under 200.  By the beginning of 2012, it was nearly 700.  It’s unclear whether the number reflects an actual increase or just better identification, but Malaby would like to see it lowered.

His bill aims to do that by requiring health care providers to report babies from birth to 12 months of age who exhibit signs of potential fetal exposure to alcohol to the Department of Health and Human Services.  The idea is that addicted parents can then access services.

But the requirement to report “potential exposure” has raised concerns.  Democratic Rep. Ann Dorney, a family physician who practices in Skowhegan, asked whether the law would apply to mothers who, say, smoked marijuana before they realized they were pregnant, but then stopped.

“It’s the same issue that happens frequently –

Article source: http://www.mpbn.net/Home/tabid/36/ctl/ViewItem/mid/5347/ItemId/26563/Default.aspx

Maine Bill’s Proposed Fetal Exposure Guidlines Generate Controversy

February 27th, 2013

The bills’ sponsor is Rep. Richard Malaby of Hancock, who recounted a story about a woman he met on the campaign trail who he says raised his awareness of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome – or NAS. 

“An elderly woman came up to me and said, ‘Do you know what I do?’  And I said, ‘No ma’am.’  And she said, ‘I’m a hugger. I go to Eastern Maine Medical Center and hold these NAS babies a couple days a week.  And furthermore, when I do that, the parents come in, and the parents often-times are addicted.’  And she noted, so too, frequently, are the grandparents.  And I thought, ‘Good for her.  Bad for us,'” Malaby recalled.

In 2005, The number of drug-affected Maine babies was under 200.  By the beginning of 2012, it was nearly 700.  It’s unclear whether the number reflects an actual increase or just better identification, but Malaby would like to see it lowered.

His bill aims to do that by requiring health care providers to report babies from birth to 12 months of age who exhibit signs of potential fetal exposure to alcohol to the Department of Health and Human Services.  The idea is that addicted parents can then access services.

But the requirement to report “potential exposure” has raised concerns.  Democratic Rep. Ann Dorney, a family physician who practices in Skowhegan, asked whether the law would apply to mothers who, say, smoked marijuana before they realized they were pregnant, but then stopped.

“It’s the same issue that happens frequently –

Article source: http://www.mpbn.net/Home/tabid/36/ctl/ViewItem/mid/5347/ItemId/26563/Default.aspx

Maine bill seeks to regulate drones

February 27th, 2013

Posted: 11:02 AM
Updated: 11:27 PM

Maine bill seeks to regulate police use of drones

The bill would limit the ability of law enforcement to use drones and require a warrant in most cases.

By Michael Shepherd mshepherd@mainetoday.com
State House Bureau

AUGUSTA — Maine police have yet to launch a drone to gather information from the sky, but the prospect of law enforcement surveillance overhead was enough to prompt a legislative hearing Tuesday on a bill that would regulate drone use.

Christopher Taylor, president and drone designer for Viking Unmanned Aerial Systems, of Limington, talks about his company’s FR-Xtreme drone model, which is on table, on Tuesday at the State House in Augusta.The company’s website calls it a “Vertical Take-Off and Landing Commercial Quad Copter built to serve multiple industries.”

Staff photo by Joe Phelan

State Sen. John Patrick introduces L.D. 236, An Act To Protect the Privacy of Citizens from Domestic Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Use, before the Legislature’s Judiciary Committee on Tuesday at the State House in Augusta.

Staff photo by Joe Phelan

Additional Photos Below

TRACKING USE OF, RESTRICTIONS ON DRONES

• The most popular consumer drone on Amazon.com is the 22-inch-long Parrot AR.Drone 2.0 Quadricopter, available for $295.77 with free shipping. It can be controlled by tilts from a smartphone or tablet, capturing high-definition video and pictures. However, it has only a

Article source: http://www.kjonline.com/news/Maine-bill-seeks-to-regulate-drones.html

Legislators unveil details of plan to regulate, tax, decriminalize marijuana

February 26th, 2013


Legislators unveil details of plan to regulate, tax, decriminalize marijuana

AUGUSTA — To build on the success of Maine’s record with medical marijuana, lawmakers say it’s time for the state to allow recreational use and possession.
Maine Rep. Diane Russell, D-Portland, and Rep.

Article source: http://www.portlanddailysun.me/index.php/newsx/local-news/8741-legislators-unveil-details-of-plan-to-regulate-tax-decriminalize-marijuana

Bill calls for Maine referendum to legalize pot

February 25th, 2013

February 22

Maine lawmaker pushes to legalize small amounts of marijuana

Similar propositions have been defeated before in Maine, but now two other states have legalized it, demonstrating a wider acceptance.

By Michael Shepherd mshepherd@mainetoday.com
State House Bureau

AUGUSTA — Maine would become the third state in the nation to legalize recreational marijuana use if lawmakers and voters approve a bill introduced Thursday by a Portland legislator.

The measure sponsored by Rep. Diane Russell, D-Portland, would allow individuals 21 and older to possess two-and-a-half ounces of marijuana and six plants. It also calls for licensing cultivators, producers of products containing marijuana, retailers and laboratories.

Her bill would also impose an excise tax on growers that she says would generate $13 million in revenue for the state.

The bill’s text has not been released, but Russell said the legalization question would go to statewide referendum if approved by the Legislature.

Similar bills introduced by Russell and others in the past have been unsuccessful. But with medical use of marijuana already legal in Maine and recreational use legalized last year in Colorado and Washington state, Russell thinks there may be increased support for her bill.

“We have proven here in Maine that this can be done for medicinal purposes,” she said at a Thursday news conference. “It is now time to institute that same strict, regulatory infrastructure for responsible, adult recreational consumers.”

Marijuana – even medical marijuana

Article source: http://www.kjonline.com/news/Advocates-Marijuana-legalization-bill-.html

Medical Marijuana Patient Daisy Bram Arraigned on Cultivation Charges

February 24th, 2013


By Thomas H. Clarke on February 21, 2013
Read More: California, Grassroots Reports, Medical Marijuana News, The War on Marijuana




Daisy Bram with sons Zeus and Thor.

Daisy Bram with sons Zeus and Thor. (family photo)

RED BLUFF, CA — Medical marijuana patient Daisy Bram was arraigned in Tehama County court Wednesday on marijuana cultivation charges.

Bram was arrested on January 22, along with Jayme Jeff Walsh, on suspicion of cultivating marijuana, possessing it for sale and child endangerment.

Despite their status as medical marijuana patients under California state law, both Bram and Walsh have been charged with felony marijuana possession and possession with intent to sell for the medical marijuana garden found at their Butte County home.

The child endangerment charges stemmed from marijuana being found in the home with children present, as well as Daisy’s consumption of cannabis while breastfeeding.

“The state should not be able to enter anyone’s home, abduct the family, severely traumatize the young children, and do so with public tax dollars,” says Bram. “It defies logic if you think of a mother consuming cannabis and breast-feeding facing a child abuse charge.”

This is the second run-in with recalcitrant local authorities for

Article source: http://www.thedailychronic.net/2013/15659/ca-medical-marijuana-patient-daisy-bram-arraigned-on-cultivation-charges/

OUR OPINION: Job loss an unwanted side effect of medical pot

February 24th, 2013

12:00 AM

OUR OPINION: Job loss an unwanted side effect of medical pot

The disconnect between federal law and state law when it comes to marijuana was on display again last week in a lawsuit filed by a Pittsfield woman who says she lost her job for receiving medical care.

Brittany Thomas alleges that she was refused rehire following a layoff when she failed a urine test for marijuana. Thomas is a registered medical marijuana user under state law.

Thomas, who suffers from extreme back pain, came to marijuana after finding narcotic pain killers to have too many unwanted side effects, including potential addiction. An irony of this case is that Thomas would not have lost her job if she had been using opiates approved by the Food and Drug Administration, even though those drugs would be far more disruptive to her performance on the job.

The problem Thomas and other medical marijuana users face is that, while the substance has been cleared for therapeutic use in Maine and 15 other states, it is still illegal under federal law.

Not that anyone is worried about prosecution. The U.S. Department of Justice has all but said that it would not go after medical marijuana users or suppliers in states where it is legal, and Washington state officials say the U.S. Attorney General has all but absolved them from any prosecution as they set up a first-in-the-nation recreational marijuana program that was approved by voters last year.

A bill to give Maine voters a chance to do

Article source: http://www.kjonline.com/opinion/job-loss-an-unwanted-side-effect-of-medical-pot_2013-02-23.html

North Carolina Medical Marijuana Bill Killed With Extreme Prejudice

February 23rd, 2013


By Phillip Smith on February 22, 2013
Read More: Medical Marijuana Bills, Medical Marijuana News, North Carolina, North Carolina – HB 84, Pending Legislation
Topics: , , , , ,




RALEIGH, NC – A bill that would legalize the use of medical marijuana in the Tarheel State is dead after a legislative committee killed it to avoid having to hear any more about it from constituents.

Rep. Paul Skip Stam says his committee killed medical marijuana legislation because they were being harassed by citizens who contacted them on the issue.

Rep. Paul “Skip” Stam says his committee killed medical marijuana legislation because they were being “harassed” by citizens who contacted them on the issue.

The North Carolina Medical Cannabis Act (House Bill 84) would have allowed patients suffering from debilitating diseases or conditions or their caregivers to possess up to 24 ounces of usable marijuana and have a garden of up to 250 square feet. It would

Article source: http://www.thedailychronic.net/2013/15690/north-carolina-medical-marijuana-bill-killed-with-extreme-prejudice/