Archive for December, 2010

Northwest News: Forest Grove woman drops 150 pounds, lands in People Magazine …

December 31st, 2010

If prisoners want legally prescribed marijuana, let them spend their own money on it. Also, spend your own money on all advanced medical care you need, or be billed for it and work it off when you get out. If you are in prison for selling drugs to only those over 18, you should be released. Welcome to the new normal.

Article source: http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/index.ssf/2010/12/northwest_news_forest_grove_woman_drops_150_pounds_lands_in_people_magazine_washington_felons_ask_pe.html

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December 29th, 2010

Christmas program

LEWISTON — There will be a program of Christmas Lessons and Carols at 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 2, in the Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul.

The Festival of Lessons and Carols is a service of Scripture and song that dates to the late 19th century. Scripture lessons recount the Fall, the promise of a Messiah, the Incarnation and the Great Commission to preach the Good News. Each lesson is followed by a carol or other song that reflects on the lesson’s message and a brief prayer.

Admission is free, although donations may be given to the organ restoration fund.

College planning

LEWISTON — The Maine Educational Opportunity Center will host free workshops, “Essentials of College Planning,” at Lewiston CareerCenter, 5 Mollison Way, 10 a.m. Wednesdays, Jan. 5 and 19. To register or for more information, call 1-800-281-3703 or visit http://meoc.maine.edu.

ADD support

GARDINER — The Learning Disabilities Association of Maine will host an “ADD and Learning Disabilities Adult Support Group” meeting from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 11, at Gardiner Area High School, Room 102, 48 West Hill Road.

This would be an appropriate group for an adult who has ADD/LD or for a person who knows an adult who has ADD/LD. Spouses are welcome. There is no cost.

Those who have questions may call 582-5791 for more information.

Marijuana seminar

AUBURN — A free seminar, “All about Medical Marijuana,” will take place from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 22, at the Auburn Public Library, 49 Spring St. For more information, call 312-5798 or visit www.remedycompassioncenter.org.

Cribbage

Article source: http://www.sunjournal.com/node/962567/

Pair follows ‘calling’ to sell medical marijuana

December 28th, 2010

Called the Remedy Compassion Center and expected to open this spring, the dispensary is one of eight that state health officials will allow in Maine after Jan. 1. In its 10,000 square feet, set next to a craft store, the center will grow, harvest, and sell marijuana.

Article source: http://www.boston.com/news/local/maine/articles/2010/12/28/pair_follows_calling_to_sell_medical_marijuana/

Medical marijuana collective opens Federal Way branch; owner welcomes state …

December 27th, 2010

Green Piece Alternative Medicine and Education (GAME) Collective may be Federal Way’s first storefront medical marijuana dispensary.

Federal Way woman stabbed in chest and side

Pranksters make dirty fork illustration | Federal Way crime blotter

Tensions hit home for Korean-Americans in Federal Way

Free recycling of Christmas trees and Styrofoam in Federal Way

Read more from Federal Way Mirror

In a strip mall off South 333rd Street and Pacific Highway South, most storefronts bear Korean names except for one newbie. A sign on the plain glass door gives a phone number, hours of operation and a list of medicated edibles like cookies. Qualified clients can buy medical-grade cannabis inside the studio-like room, where mirrors line one wall, legal documents hang on another wall, a TV hums in the ceiling corner and lounge chairs sit on the floor. On a desk is a pipe shaped like a Seahawks helmet, with a short length of hose and a handwritten note granting permission to try it.

Brionne Corbray opened the third branch of his collective Oct. 1 in Federal Way. The collective, with two branches in Seattle, advertises openly online and in alternative publications.

In mid-December, the Washington State Department of Revenue announced plans to collect a sales tax from marijuana dispensaries. Corbray welcomes a sales tax because he can make more money. In fact, he would rather be a retail outlet store than a non-profit, he said.

“It’s the new gold rush,” said Corbray, 46, of Seattle. “We should be paying taxes.

Article source: http://www.seattlepi.com/sound/432390_sound112411384.html

Top 10 in 2010

December 26th, 2010

Posted: December 26
Updated: Today at 12:21 AM

Top 10 in 2010

Readers choose Maine’s biggest newsmakers of the year.

From staff reports

For Maine readers, 2010 was a political year to remember.

Gov.-elect Paul LePage

Mainer Seth Wescott won a gold medal at the Vancouver Winter Olympics in the men’s snowboard-cross, coming from behind. It was the second gold for Wescott, who also won in 2006.

Press Herald file photo

Additional Photos Below

Related headlines

Readers of The Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram overwhelmingly selected the victory of Gov.-elect Paul LePage as the top Maine news story of the year.

The next two stories they chose also involved hard-fought races on the November ballot: the Republican Party capturing control of both chambers of the state Legislature, and voters narrowly approving the state’s first casino with table games. Two other stories in the top 10 also featured politics on a national and local scale.

But there were also stories of triumph and humanitarian efforts. Readers also recognized a South Portland lawyer who found himself in the national spotlight.

(We

Article source: http://www.pressherald.com/news/top-10-in-2010_2010-12-26.html

Top 10 in 2010

December 26th, 2010

Posted: December 26
Updated: Today at 12:21 AM

Top 10 in 2010

Readers choose Maine’s biggest newsmakers of the year.

From staff reports

For Maine readers, 2010 was a political year to remember.

Gov.-elect Paul LePage

Mainer Seth Wescott won a gold medal at the Vancouver Winter Olympics in the men’s snowboard-cross, coming from behind. It was the second gold for Wescott, who also won in 2006.

Press Herald file photo

Additional Photos Below

Related headlines

Readers of The Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram overwhelmingly selected the victory of Gov.-elect Paul LePage as the top Maine news story of the year.

The next two stories they chose also involved hard-fought races on the November ballot: the Republican Party capturing control of both chambers of the state Legislature, and voters narrowly approving the state’s first casino with table games. Two other stories in the top 10 also featured politics on a national and local scale.

But there were also stories of triumph and humanitarian efforts. Readers also recognized a South Portland lawyer who found himself in the national spotlight.

(We

Article source: http://www.pressherald.com/news/top-10-in-2010_2010-12-26.html

Lewiston Considers New Regs on Medical Marijuana Caregivers

December 24th, 2010

Approved by voters last year, Maine’s new law sets up eight regional dispensaries. It also allows caregivers who provide limited amounts of marijuana to fewer than five patients and who register with the state, to do so in the privacy of their own homes.

Licensed caregivers have to pay a fee up front with the state–$300 per patient. Plants must be cultivated in an enclosed, locked facility.

But now, the city of Lewiston is expected to take a final vote on rules that would limit the areas where medical marijuana could be grown, subject caregivers who care for more than two patients to municipal registration, additional fees and background checks and prohibit cultivation in apartments.

“My name is Jonathan, and I don’t want to really say my last name just ’cause of everything that’s kind of going on now, with Maine saying you could do a certain thing and now Lewiston saying you can’t do that certain thing, and a lot of people are kind of scared to come out as it is anyway.”

A resident of Lewiston, Jonathan says he provides medical marijuana for two patients, both friends, on fixed incomes. He also expects to begin growing the drug for a family member soon. But he’s worried about the effects of Lewiston’s proposed restrictions on his small operation that he runs out of a closet.

“I live in an apartment building right now,” he says. “There’s other areas that I could also

Article source: http://www.mpbn.net/News/MaineNewsArchive/tabid/181/ctl/ViewItem/mid/3475/ItemId/14418/Default.aspx

Nationwide ban on ‘fake pot’ kicks in Friday

December 22nd, 2010

A synthetic form of marijuana known as K2 is displayed at a local Bangor business. The dried herbs sprayed with chemicals in a three gram package sells for $25.

BANGOR, Maine — Locally sold herbal products that reportedly provide a marijuana-like high have been banned by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration effective at the end of this week. According to the Federal Register, the ban is “necessary to avoid an imminent hazard to the public safety.”

Known as Spice, K2, “fake pot,” synthetic marijuana and by a host of other names, the products typically are marketed as incense or potpourri and sell for $30 to $40 a gram, or about twice the street value of marijuana, according to Bangor police Lt. Tom Reagan. Reagan is among numerous law enforcement and medical professionals in Maine and the United States who have expressed concern about the products — which have a number of potentially serious side effects — and applaud the ban.

The products are made from plant material spiked with synthetic cannabinoids, the active ingredient in marijuana. Spice and several variations of the product have been widely available at tobacco and smoke shops, head shops and convenience stores, including some in Bangor.

Usually smoked or mixed with food, the products have been especially popular

Article source: http://new.bangordailynews.com/2010/12/22/health/nationwide-ban-on-%E2%80%98fake-pot%E2%80%99-kicks-in-friday/

Another View: Marijuana column overstated risks, downplayed benefits

December 19th, 2010

December 19

Another View: Marijuana column overstated risks, downplayed benefits

Pot would be legal if the laws were driven by public health standards instead of culture.

Regarding Mark Publicker’s Maine Voices column, (“Medical marijuana act silent on potential risks,” Nov. 29): If health outcomes determined drug laws instead of cultural norms, marijuana would be legal.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Robert Sharpe, MPA, is a policy analyst with Common Sense for Drug Policy in Arlington, Va.

Unlike alcohol, marijuana has never been shown to cause an overdose death, nor does it share the addictive properties of tobacco.

Marijuana can be harmful if abused, but jail cells are inappropriate as health interventions and ineffective as deterrents.

The first marijuana laws were enacted in response to Mexican immigration during the early 1900s, despite opposition from the American Medical Association.

Dire warnings that marijuana inspires homicidal rages have been counterproductive at best.

White Americans did not even begin to smoke pot until a soon-to-be entrenched federal bureaucracy began funding “reefer madness” propaganda.

Marijuana prohibition has failed miserably as a deterrent. The United States has higher rates of marijuana use than the Netherlands, where marijuana is legally available to adults.

The only clear winners in the war

Article source: http://www.pressherald.com/opinion/marijuana-column-overstated-risks-downplayed-benefits_2010-12-19.html

Medical marijuana: Maine learns lessons from Montana

December 18th, 2010

Stevie Wonder, a strain of medical marijuana at Pure Medical Center is displayed with all of it's testing information to help patients and dispensers know the strength and traits of the plant.     POT30-- John, who has amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), often referred to as Lou Gehrig's Disease, buys medical marijuana at Cannabis Medical in Denver. He said, smoking marijuana helps him with pain from his ALS. Master gardener Chris Miller tends to his crop at Montana Pain Management Inc. in Missoula, Montana in this November 2009 file photo. Patrons of Zoo Mountain Natural Care Inc. in Missoula, Montana can examine samples of pot the company offers before buying. April 2010 file photo.

With the strong support of voters in November 2009, Maine became one of just a handful of states that not only allow the cultivation and possession of marijuana for personal medical use but also make marijuana available in retail settings.

Nonprofit storefront dispensaries are preparing to open in eight Maine communities within the next few months, bringing medical grade marijuana to qualified patients throughout the state.

Maine’s program is rolling out in a limited way, thanks to rulemaking that imposed considerable constraint on the relatively wide-open language of the 2009 citizen’s initiative that created it. The eight dispensaries must meet strict requirements for security, hours of operation, patient education and public

Article source: http://new.bangordailynews.com/2010/12/17/health/maine-proceeds-carefully-with-its-pot-program-after-other-states-face-legislative-complications/